52 Cameras: Camera 68 part 2 – Olympus XA 1

I took the XA 1 with me to climb Cabezon. A challenging day, light-wise. Small storms kept puffing off of Mt. Taylor and blowing across the Rio Puerco Valley so we had heavy rain and scorching sun taking turns all morning. Too much lightning so we turned around.

Cabezon

Cabezon

Abandoned house near San Luis.

Abandoned house near San Luis.

Since the climb was a bust we drove into the Ojito Wilderness.

Since the climb was a bust we drove into the Ojito Wilderness.

My climbing buds checking out the dinosaur tracks.

My climbing buds checking out the dinosaur tracks.

52 Cameras: Camera 67 part 2 – Minolta Weathermatic

Processed and scanned by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

No post-processing other than resizing for upload.

Chillin' after playing in the surf on Coronado Island.

Chillin’ after playing in the surf on Coronado Island.

Gorgeous flecks of gold color in the sand.

Gorgeous flecks of gold color in the sand.

Salton Sea fishermen.

Salton Sea fishermen.

This says it all.  Dreams of buying into the good life...

This says it all. Dreams of buying into the good life…

Working on her field notes.  Cell zombies silhouetted in the background.

Working on her field notes. Cell zombies silhouetted in the background.

52 Cameras: Camera 66 part 2 – Nikon FE2

At this rate I may collect the whole set. This is another awesome camera.

The next two photos and the ones at the end of the video were shot with the Series E 50mm f/1.8 lens on expired Fujicolor Super HQ 100 film.

My sweetie with the dragon kite.

My sweetie with the dragon kite.

Acequia culvert.

Acequia culvert.

The next photos were shot using a Tokina AT-X 28-85mm zoom I got on a Nikon FE. It’s not super bright, f/3.5-4.5, but it’s not a bad walking around lens and the macro is pretty good. From what I could find on line, close focus is 1.5 feet at 28mm. Seems about right — I didn’t biff too many flower shots. Film is a 12 exposure roll of expired Kodak Gold 200.

Flowers by the house.  Macro is tough on a windy day.

Flowers by the house. Macro is tough on a windy day.

I can't mow the yard.  Look at all the daisies!

I can’t mow the yard. Look at all the daisies!

I'll have to try this shot again.  I almost captured the melancholy mood.

I’ll have to try this shot again. I almost captured the melancholy mood.

52 Cameras: Camera 63.5 part 2 – Bell+Howell Ultra Compact 35 (28mm) — converted to pinhole

Shot for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, 26 April 2015.

Expired Kodak 400 film processed and scanned by my good friends at The Camera Shop Of Santa Fe.

I didn’t think to factor in the short lens to film plane distance so the image circle doesn’t cover the 35mm film frame.

The image I submitted:

Teepees in Taos.

Teepees in Taos.

The camera.

The camera.

Some more from the second roll (also expired Kodak 400).

Looking up through a gnarly tree in Taos.

Looking up through a gnarly tree in Taos.

The vignetting is nice with the flowers.

The vignetting is nice with the flowers.

Interesting effect shooting into the sun.

Interesting effect shooting into the sun.

The next three were taken at the Classical Gas Museum in Embudo, NM.

Long before I was a veg, I loved the patty melt at Vip's Big Boy in Santa Fe.  Big Boy is a little creepy.

Long before I was a veg, I loved the patty melt at Vip’s Big Boy in Santa Fe. Big Boy is a little creepy.

Huntin' dinosaurs.

Huntin’ dinosaurs.

Hubcap collection.

Hubcap collection.

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day: 26 May 2015 — My backup

I didn’t end up using the digital camera (Canon 60D) as much as I thought I would. Most of the shots with the Bell+Howell, I winged it.

The conversion was pretty straightforward — The metal pinhole from the cardboard camera from last year taped to a T-mount lens adapter for the Canon. I only used the needle to make sure the hole was clear and clean of cat hair.

The bits, minus the tape.  Lens adapter, pinhole, and plastic from a Fuji Polaroid film pack.

The bits, minus the tape. Lens adapter, pinhole, and plastic from a Fuji Polaroid film pack.

Fully assembled "lens".

Fully assembled “lens”.

Mounted and ready to roll.

Mounted and ready to roll.

My favorite shot from the Canon. I think the pinhole is larger than necessary so the kit will give something to a kid using the Ridley camera.

Cow skull at a museum on NM 64.

Cow skull at a museum on NM 64.

52 Cameras: Camera 65 part 2 – Polaroid Automatic Land Camera 420

Scanned at 1200DPI on a Canon MP480. No edits other than cropping and straightening.

I had wanted to get some shots in bright light for the second half of the pack but wasn’t to be.

This is the most natural light I had and it was pretty early in the morning. Soft light is usually desirable but Fujifilm FP-3000B can be pretty unforgiving stuff.

Derelict tractor.

Derelict tractor.

Scanning the negatives pulls the contrast way back. Depending on the shot, having more mid tones without white-white and black-black can be good or bad.

Inverted negative (with cat hair).

Inverted negative (with cat hair).

The Polaroid Focused Flash # 490 is made for Hi-Power FlashCubes. Their mount has ‘L’ shaped plastic pegs instead of rectangular so you don’t accidentally use the wrong cubes. I didn’t have any Hi-Power FlashCubes so I used a razor blade and trimmed regular cubes to fit. The porch where the bag is hanging was dark so it worked — just not as well as having the right flash.

Cat hydration setup.

Cat hydration setup.

I used the weaker FlashCube again. The print is really dark. The inverted negative scan is a bit flat. Another great thing about the Fujifilm negatives — you can get a usable image even if the print is way too dark.

Negative scan.

Negative scan.

Remember to let the developer goo dry before you put negatives on the scanner.