52 Cameras: Thornward Dandy No. 5


Sources & mentions in the video:

Label & strut pictures. And quite a collection:
http://dtristramludwig.com/collection.html

1905 Montgomery Ward catalog:
http://www.piercevaubel.com/cam/catalogs/1905wardslp096.htm

Wollensak Junior info & 1903 catalog:
https://alphaxbetax.com/Wollensak%20Lens%20and%20Shutter%20Compendium/#Junior

1912-1913 Wollensak Lens and Shutter Catalog:
https://alphaxbetax.com/wollensak-catalogs-etc/

Aperture, f-Stops, and the U.S. System:
http://throughavintagelens.com/2010/01/the-u-s-f-stop-system/



What looks like a reflection at the bottom of the image is a note written on the back with a marker. It doesn’t show up on the paper but the scanner light brought it out on the image.
Arista paper negative. This was in the 1st batch & I over-processed a bit. The contrast is cool but not a lot of detail.

Arista paper negative. This was in the 1st batch & I over-processed a bit. The contrast is cool but not a lot of detail.


Arista paper negative. A Mamiya TLR I'll feature soon. Bit of a light leak.

Arista paper negative. A Mamiya TLR I’ll feature soon. Bit of a light leak.


Arista 4x5 film. Contrast is from shooting into the sunset. Cropped for light leak.

Arista 4×5 film. Contrast is from shooting into the sunset. Cropped for light leak.

It’s just a battery. Honest!

Sometimes I watch Youtube videos on a channel called “The 8-Bit Guy”. I originally saw one on restoring an Osborne 1 “portable” computer. When I started at Computerland going on two score years ago, they’d been without a service department guy for a while. I walked in to a stack of Osbornes needing repair and learned fast. Any way it caught my eye.

I watched a video on rebuilding the battery pack in an old Apple laptop. Afterward, what happened was so bizarre, I had to comment on the video:

“You can’t make this up. Our smart TV asked me to rate this video with this dialog:

I put a link to the photo in the Youtube comment. I don't think you can add attachments to comments.

I put a link to the photo in the Youtube comment. I don’t think you can add attachments to comments.

I’m in the US, don’t log in on the TV, and I’ve never been asked to rate a video before. I think Youtube’s algorithm may have thought the batteries were, um, something else. At the risk of getting agency attention, I gave it 5 stars. Great content BTW.”

If anyone needs me, I’ll be at a black site somewhere.

Got My Turbo-Charged Cranky Pants On

I need to re-do a small porch deck. First, I need a post to replace the rotten one I pulled out.
Lowes is an OK store for a big box but their web site is a freaking train wreck. It asks if it can use your location (I have that set to always ask) but it doesn’t do anything with it. You still have to set which store using a zip code.

Three copies of the same item and one other.

Three copies of the same item and one other.


Make sure there are plenty before I brave the virus-laden hordes.

Make sure there are plenty before I brave the virus-laden hordes.


There were not 47. There were two sad, bowed pieces. This is supposed to be tied to the inventory, that’s why it matters which store you’re looking at. I can understand it might be stale if things are off the shelf and on the way to the register but the store wasn’t crowded. They’re letting in 35 people at a time (kudos for that) and there were not 45 4″x4″x10′ posts in transit. There weren’t any I could see. I didn’t get all pee-pee hearted over this one time. Their item count is never even close. Calling doesn’t help. If “customer service” picks up, they just do the same lookup I did and parrot the web site to you over the phone.

Back to the web site…

I was also pricing some deck material.

Stay in school kids. You will need math.

Stay in school kids. You will need math.


To be fair, I’ve seen the same “buy more, pay more” pricing on Amazon too but…
They were told about the problem six months ago and haven't done anything about it.

They were told about the problem six months ago and haven’t done anything about it.


This next part is only sort of a Lowes problem.
"Clamshell" color. In person it's more the color of asphalt and really uneven. Lowes just used the Trex graphics.

“Clam Shell” color. In person it’s more the color of asphalt and really uneven. Lowes just used the Trex graphics.


From Trex's web site. It looks solid but it's not.

From Trex’s web site. It looks solid but it’s not.


This is the zoom function on the Lowes web site. This is a different board – the non-notched version – but the zooms are the same. It just blows up the Trex JPEG nice and fuzzy.
Pretty sure these are renderings and not actual pictures of the product.

Pretty sure these are renderings and not actual pictures of the product.


I left my phone in the car so I didn’t get pictures but the gray is a super-thin plastic coating on top. Underneath, it looks like the sawdust in the laminate floor we put in the house. That stuff warps like crazy with a teaspoon of cat vomit. Does this really survive outdoors? The warranty is for 25 years (I haven’t read the fine print) so maybe it does last. It’s butt-ugly IRL though, so I’ll keep looking.

Glutton for punishment that I am, I also need a 1/8 inch diameter masonry bit.

It's in quotes but I don't think they have 1871 different 1/8 inch masonry bits.

It’s in quotes but I don’t think they have 1871 different 1/8 inch masonry bits.


Raw search results give bit diameter as a filter. No useful options, but the function is there.
The "3-in" is a giant auger bit for digging holes in the dirt.

The “3-in” is a giant auger bit for digging holes in the dirt.


If you go down the categories so you don’t get things like 3 inch auger bits, you get far fewer results than 1871. Maybe it’s nit picking, but “1/8 inch masonry drill bit” is not the same as “1/8” or “inch” or “masonry” or “drill” or “bit”.
1871 <> 322.

1871 <> 322.


When selecting a tool to make a hole, what are the two questions you have to ask? 1) What are you making a hole in? and 2) How big a hole? You can drill down (no pun intended) to “Masonry Drill Bits” to answer the first question but when you use the categories, the bit diameter filter isn’t there.
No bit diameter filter. For drill bits. Really? The code is already written for cryin' out loud.

No bit diameter filter. For drill bits. Really? The code is already written for cryin’ out loud.


The search bar is always global. It does not search within the selected category so you have to scroll and scroll within the category. The images don’t help except to weed out “not even close” and the descriptions are short and vague so you have to guess, click, scroll down to the specs, expand the specs menu, read what the diameter is, hit the back button, wait for the page to reload, and repeat until you’ve pissed away more time than it would’ve taken to just drive to the store and see for yourself.

I ended up buying nothing. Got out of the house and took a drive to the store so I got that going for me.

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day 2020 (backup and backup-backup)

For 2020, I’m doing an extremely-long-exposure photograph or solargraph. The Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day rules are that the photograph must be taken “on the day annually designated as Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day ( April 26, 2020 )” or “Extremely long exposures will be accepted if any part of the exposure was made on Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day…”

I started the exposure on 1 May 2019 and I want to do a full year. That means if the exposure is a bust, I’ve missed WPPD and I’ve got nothing.

So… I decided to make another pinhole camera and use a scanner. I used a USB powered Canon LIDE 30 as a digital back and VueScan and TWAIN-SANE software. The results are not a supreme victory but first, the camera.

JPEG from a PDF page print from http://mrpinhole.com/. I used 8×10 inches as the portion of the 8.5×11″ scanner in case I had to resort to paper. The 16″ film dimension is insurance and a trade off to get the specs I wanted.

I wanted to keep exposure simple and let in a lot of light so I chose a 1mm pinhole and a 10 inch (254mm) focal length to get f/256-ish, a nice power of 2.

I wanted to keep exposure simple and let in a lot of light so I chose a 1mm pinhole and a 10 inch (254mm) focal length to get f/256-ish, a nice power of 2.


It's big so the image won't be super sharp but the pinhole came out pretty well.

It’s big so the image won’t be super sharp but the pinhole came out pretty well.


Foamboard is versatile stuff.

Foamboard is versatile stuff.


I had to actually think about how to get the required sizes from a 20x30" piece. The horror!

I had to actually think about how to get the required sizes from a 20×30″ piece. The horror!


Hot glue is wonderful stuff. Too bad I didn't account for the thickness in the construction calculations (had to fudge a bit).

Hot glue is wonderful stuff. Too bad I didn’t account for the thickness in the construction calculations (had to fudge a bit).


I made it too tall on purpose but the 1st rough cut is fugly.

I made it too tall on purpose but the 1st rough cut is fugly.


It sanded up rather nicely.

It sanded up rather nicely.


Pinhole mount coming along.

Pinhole mount coming along.


Pinhole READY TO ROCK! Too much? Anyway, I'm excited.

Pinhole READY TO ROCK! Too much? Anyway, I’m excited.


Black construction paper to fill in the gaps.

Black construction paper to fill in the gaps.


The assembled beast.

The assembled beast.


Sadly, in the short term, it was not to be. I got something, but nothing to write home about.

Tree in the back yard.

Tree in the back yard.


Different scan settings. Tree in the back yard.

Different scan settings. Tree in the back yard.


I’m not completely ignorant about exposure. Something is going on with the scanner. I even tried an emergency, 1/2 the focal distance (f/128-ish) cardboard box.

Maybe this will help.

Maybe this will help.


Not happy with the results, I had to implement plan C. I replaced the scanner with print paper.

The super-complex, 8x10 print paper taped to a piece of foam board version.

The super-complex, 8×10 print paper taped to a piece of foam board version.


The result is pretty sweet. I’m not insane (about this any way) and the camera works well.

Tree in the back yard. Inexpensive Arista photo paper negative. Metered for ISO 6 at f/256.

Tree in the back yard. Inexpensive Arista photo paper negative. Metered for ISO 6 at f/256.

I’m up late and it’s actually May 1st. At about 3:00 PM local time I’ll cover the shutter and find out if the long exposure worked.

Tougodo Hit Teardown

Camera video with images is here.

The camera was working on bulb (B) most of the time but not instant (I). The lens was in dire need of cleaning too.

This isn’t a complete tear-down. I didn’t open the viewfinder or remove the wind knob. This started just as notes for myself so there are some gaps in the images. I’ll try to fill in with text instructions.

Remove the lens ring inside the body. It's a left hand thread. I couldn't get a lens wrench past the film gate so I used a couple of small screwdrivers.

Remove the lens ring inside the body. It’s a left hand thread. I couldn’t get a lens wrench past the film gate so I used a couple of small screwdrivers.


The lens ring also holds the inner copper (?) body. It won't quite come out without removing the wind knob but it wasn't necessary for getting to the shutter & lens.

The lens ring also holds the inner copper (?) body. It won’t quite come out without removing the wind knob but it wasn’t necessary for getting to the shutter & lens.


The lens/shutter assembly comes out after removing the ring. The little screw is the Instant/Bulb selector. It didn't need to come off but I didn't know that at the time. The trim plate acts as a washer so it might be part of the lens distance as well as being cosmetic.

The lens/shutter assembly comes out after removing the ring. The little screw is the Instant/Bulb selector. It didn’t need to come off but I didn’t know that at the time. The trim plate acts as a washer so it might be part of the lens distance as well as being cosmetic.


The lens surround is press-fitted to the shutter. A gentle squeeze to the shutter body near the I/B selector (there's a little bump out on the shutter body) while pulling with your thumbnail near the shutter switch will pop it off.

The lens surround is press-fitted to the shutter. A gentle squeeze to the shutter body near the I/B selector (there’s a little bump out on the shutter body) while pulling with your thumbnail near the shutter switch will pop it off.


There's the culprit. The spring had come off of its post. Sitting there without tension for however many years may be why my shutter is fast. If it didn't need cleaning (and if I wasn't curious) I could have put the spring on the post and reassembled here.

There’s the culprit. The spring had come off of its post. Sitting there without tension for however many years may be why my shutter is fast. If it didn’t need cleaning (and if I wasn’t curious) I could have put the spring on the post and reassembled here.


The I/B selector screw screws into this springy copper bit. The springy bit provides friction so the selector doesn't flop around. The end of the screw blocks the spring post on the inner (brass) shutter to provide bulb.

The I/B selector screw screws into this springy copper bit. The springy bit provides friction so the selector doesn’t flop around. The end of the screw blocks the spring post on the inner (brass) shutter to provide bulb.


The big brass screw holds the outer shutter and the outer shutter return spring. The upper part of the spring presses against the shutter body and the lower part presses against the edge of the outer shutter blade (the black part). See the previous image for its proper location.

The big brass screw holds the outer shutter and the outer shutter return spring. The upper part of the spring presses against the shutter body and the lower part presses against the edge of the outer shutter blade (the black part). See the previous image for its proper location.


The copper springy bit. This is reversed from how it goes in. The round part goes in first toward the back of the shutter body, away from the lens.

The copper springy bit. This is reversed from how it goes in. The round part goes in first toward the back of the shutter body, away from the lens.


The inner shutter pivots on this flatter brass screw. It has an unthreaded part that acts as a spacer and shaft for the shutter.

The inner shutter pivots on this flatter brass screw. It has an unthreaded part that acts as a spacer and shaft for the shutter.


With the inner shutter removed, you can see the aperture. It's held in with the small brass screw.

With the inner shutter removed, you can see the aperture. It’s held in with the small brass screw.


Finally, all the way to the bottom. The screw also acts as a spacer for the aperture. That's some quality blackening on the aperture.

Finally, all the way to the bottom. The screw also acts as a spacer for the aperture. That’s some quality blackening on the aperture.

Not shown: 1) Cleaned the shutter parts. I used cotton swabs and lighter fluid. 2) Re-blackened the aperture with a permanent marker. 3) Cleaned the lens front and back with lens cleaner. I doubt if it is coated so window cleaner might be OK.

I tried pre-fitting the inner shutter screw but I couldn't seem to get the screw lined up with the hole in the aperture.

I tried pre-fitting the inner shutter screw but I couldn’t seem to get the screw lined up with the hole in the aperture.


Instead, I used a tapered lens wrench piece to line up the aperture in the inner shutter and the aperture and then inserted the screw.

Instead, I used a tapered lens wrench piece to line up the aperture in the inner shutter and the aperture and then inserted the screw.


That’s pretty much it. Do the steps in reverse to reassemble. Before I put the lens/shutter assembly back on the body I did shutter speed tests.

This is a sequence of stills from a 240 frames per second video. I did about 12 shutter tests. Shutter opening didn't vary much - most were open for four frames.

This is a sequence of stills from a 240 frames per second video. I did about 12 shutter tests. Shutter opening didn’t vary much – most were open for four frames.

1/240 frames per second = 0.004166666666667 seconds per frame (~4.2ms).
Open for 4 frames = shutter open for 0.016666666666667 (~16.7ms).
Turn it into a nice shutter speed style fraction: 1/X = 0.0167. X = 60.
If I’d been thinking, since 240 is a multiple of 60 and 4 and the shutter was open for 4 frames, I could have just done it in my head. Duh.

In my defense, I do this for a lot of old, slow shutters and it’s rarely this clean.

52 Cameras: Tougodo Hit




Camera-wiki.org has a great page on the history of Tougodo (sometimes spelled Togodo).

A tear-down post is here.

Not much to show that’s not in the video. If I get crazy and try again, I’ll post more here.

Ilford SFX 200. Spooky backyard tree is spookier with ND & red filters (3 stops).

Ilford SFX 200. Spooky backyard tree is spookier with ND & red filters (3 stops).


Kodak T-MAX 100. The truck window tint was just the right amount of filter.

Kodak T-MAX 100. The truck window tint was just the right amount of filter.

52 Cameras: Apple QuickTake 200 Viewfinder Parallax

A YouTube viewer asked about the parallax error when using the clip-on optical viewfinder. I did a quick & dirty experiment to find out. Original Quicktake 200 post is here.

The 3 focus ranges are 9-13cm for close-up, 45-90cm for portrait, & 90cm-infinity for landscape. The manual says, “IMPORTANT Do not use the close-up focus when you use the viewfinder. It is not accurate.” I didn’t bother with the close up setting but the next worst parallax would be the nearest focus of the portrait setting. The manual also says, “Estimate the focal distance from the front surface of the LCD screen to the object being photographed.” The LCD is on the back so I guess they mean its surface.

I put this on the wall in the kitchen.

Sometimes, science is ugly.

Sometimes, science is ugly.


I put the camera on a small tripod, and measured the distance to the wall so the LCD was 45cm away. I looked as straight through the viewfinder as I could and held still while M slid her finger along the ruler toward the center until I could see it. We repeated that for left, right, top, and bottom. The measurements are just relative to each other, not meaningful in themselves.

Left: 29cm, Right: 67cm, Top: 10cm, Bottom: 37cm

Next, I snapped a picture with the camera in the same place. Ignore the date & time – I didn’t set the camera’s clock.

I used composite out to the old TV instead of digging out the old laptop and Smartmedia floppy adapter.

I used composite out to the old TV instead of digging out the old laptop and Smartmedia floppy adapter.


The image captured these measurements.

Left: 28cm, Right: 60cm, Top: 13cm, Bottom: 38cm

I was a little off reading the ruler. This diagram shows the relationship of the viewfinder view and the sensor image.

Pretty wide angle and not too bad for a cheap plastic clip-on viewfinder.

Pretty wide angle and not too bad for a cheap plastic clip-on viewfinder.