52 Cameras: Camera 60 part 2 – Minolta Instant Pro

This is a cool camera. The images I’ve gotten so far are kind of funky. Exposure and focus are pretty good but the color balance is nuts. I think it’s the expired Impossible Project film — every batch gets better but it still doesn’t have the stability or shelf life that Polaroid’s integral films had. Yet. Scanned on a 600DPI Canon MF8350, straightened, and cropped.

Zoe on her bed.  No special features used.  It's a catnip cigar ya perv.

Zoe on her bed. No special features used. It’s a catnip cigar ya perv.

Color balance and levels.  To get enough red to make her fur the right color, the wall is red too.

Color balance and levels. To get enough red to make her fur the right color, the wall is red too.

30 second long exposure and a laser pointer.

30 second long exposure and a laser pointer.

This is more like what I saw.  Happy Valentine's Day!

This is more like what I saw. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Close up lens.  Darkened a bit.  Some are yellow and some are white but it wasn't captured.

Close up lens. Darkened a bit. Some are yellow and some are white but it wasn’t captured.

A gloomy day and I let some light hit the print trying to get it into my pocket.

A gloomy day and I let some light hit the print trying to get it into my pocket.

Converting to B&W with a digital infrared filter makes a creepy image.

Converting to B&W with a digital infrared filter makes a creepy image.

Minolta Maxxum 7000 Film Transport Check

A viewer on the 52 Cameras channel on Youtube has a Maxxum and the film counter stays at ‘0’. I ran through a few checks on mine that might be helpful.

First, the easy stuff — check that the batteries are fresh and making good contact. The LCD can be on when there’s not enough juice to run the film transport motor. LCDs are very low power compared to motors. Some people recommend against it, but I’ve had good results cleaning battery contacts with a pencil eraser. If the contacts are really corroded, take off the battery holder, take out the batteries, and soak the holder in white vinegar. When it stops bubbling, rinse it off, dry it thoroughly, and try again.

Page 16 from the manual says to turn the camera on before loading the film.

Page 16 from the manual says to turn the camera on before loading the film.

If the film isn't laying flat, it may not engage the teeth on the sprocket.

If the film isn’t laying flat, it may not engage the teeth on the sprocket.

Make sure the rewind switch is pushed back to the right.  It's  not dangerous, I'm just pointing with a straw.

Make sure the rewind switch is pushed back to the right. It’s not dangerous, I’m just pointing with a straw.

The hook that holds the back closed also hits a switch that tells the camera the back is shut.

The hook that holds the back closed also hits a switch that tells the camera the back is shut.

When you push it in, the camera thinks the back is closed.

When you push it in, the camera thinks the back is closed.

Open the back, turn the camera on, and push the back catch with something small like my trusty cocktail straw. Watch the sprocket — it should turn. With no film, my camera tries four times. You’ll need to push the button and slide the back release down so you can close the back again.

Last, there is a little roller on the inside of the camera back. It should turn freely so it will hold the film against the take-up spool.

That’s it for checking and verifying things I can think of. If anyone has more tips, please chime in in the Youtube comments. I was invaded by spambots and had to turn comments off on the blog.

The 52 Cameras Maxxum 7000 video link.

Worst case, check Etsy, shopgoodwill.com or that online auction site. Maxxums are still really cheap.

52 Cameras: Camera 59 part 2 – Lomography Supersampler

Thanks Bill!

As far as treating this like an experiment, I did pretty much everything wrong. I had nothing but variables.

I used a camera I’d never used before.

It was loaded with unknown el-cheapo 400 film that came with the camera. The label, including the DX coding, was a sticker. It wasn’t even Lomo-branded, just a sticker.

I’d never processed color print film before so saying I’d never used the chemicals (Unicolor C-41 kit) before is kind of redundant.

Just to be a complete fool, I used a reel and tank I’d never used before too. It’s a Paterson set I got from Goodwill. The plastic reel is almost the same as the Yankee I used for the 120 B&W but I had a heck of a time getting it loaded in the dark bag. And, of course, the tank lid leaked like a $#@! when I inverted it.

I also ignored the camera manual where it says not to bother using it indoors. I tried to catch the cats in action in the house and got a whole lot of nothing.

Astonishingly, I got 11 frames with something on them. Eight of them are even reasonably well exposed.

Here are three with a wee bit of visual interest.

A bird was flying by but I was too slow on the draw.  I like the trees any way.

A bird was flying by but I was too slow on the draw. I like the trees any way.

He's not driving backwards -- I stuck the camera out the window as I passed.

He’s not driving backwards — I stuck the camera out the window as I passed.

Next door raven shot through the living room window.

Next door raven shot through the living room window.

Some crops from the raven photo.

Raven1

Raven2

Raven3

Raven4

There is a lot of exposure variation from lens to lens but that’s part of the adventure with strange, cheap cameras. It’s a lot of fun to use so we’re already burning through another roll. Negatives scanned at 4800DPI on a Canoscan 9000f and resized for upload. Straightened, cropped, and a small color tweak in Photoshop.



Processing notes:
Based on what I’ve learned from processing this roll, the next one will get a rinse between the developer and blix. I’ll also do a post-stabilizer rinse and Photoflo — there were a lot of water spots. I’ll practice with the Paterson reel and use the Yankee if it’s hosed. I may use the Yankee tank any way since it doesn’t leak. I need to get some small containers so it’s easier to keep track of the age of the chemicals.

Greenwashing anyone?

greenwash
/ˈɡriːnˌwɒʃ/
noun
1.
a superficial or insincere display of concern for the environment that is shown by an organization (1)

Hey cool!  Sprint's using an envelope that becomes another envelope.

Hey cool! Sprint’s using an envelope that becomes another envelope.

The only part of six pages (I'll grant them double-sided) going back.

The only part of six pages (I’ll grant them double-sided) going back.

Completely unnecessary content.  Sometimes they dump in retirement or insurance flyers too.

Completely unnecessary content. Sometimes they dump in retirement or insurance flyers too.

More wasted space.

More wasted space.

Blue= going back.  Green = recyclable after removing personal info.  Red = shred and throw away.

Blue= going back. Green = recyclable after removing personal info. Red = shred and throw away.

Out of six pages (three sheets) almost three are ads and filler. Subtract the useless white space on the first page and the whole thing, including Important Notices could be one double-sided sheet. I could use electronic billing/payment but Sprint’s password policy — the strongest password their system will take — is laughably weak.

(1) “greenwash.” Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition. HarperCollins Publishers. 29 Jan. 2015. Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/greenwash.

52 Cameras: Camera 57 part 2.5 – Rolleicord III

Expired Lomo ISO 100 B&W that came with M’s Diana. I’m pretty sure it’s really Shanghai or Lucky. The emulsion and backing paper are really thin so longer exposures have the same problem I had with the Voigtlander (week 9). What looks like grain or a noisy scan is the texture (and sometimes the dots and numbers) of the backing paper showing on the negative.

A few shots came out OK. I’m really happy about that since this is the first roll I have ever processed. I used Diafine, because it’s pretty much idiot-proof, and Arista Universal Rapid fixer at ~ 70F.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Goober on the sun porch.

Goober on the sun porch.

We finally got some snow.

We finally got some snow.

Scanned on the Canon 9000f at 1200DPI. Straightened and cropped but no exposure tweaks.

52 Cameras: Camera 58 part 2 – Petri 2.8

Shot on Lomography ISO 100 color print film. There was no expiration on the box but I got it with the NOS Lomo LC-A (Week 19) so it’s pretty expired. Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

Descanso on US 285 between Santa Fe and Española.

Descanso on US 285 between Santa Fe and Española.

My sweetie loves orange.

My sweetie loves orange.

My other sweetie *is* orange.

My other sweetie *is* orange.

Our rebuilt tree after the cats endo'd it and broke some ornaments.

Our rebuilt tree after the cats endo’d it and broke some ornaments.

Two of the culprits looking all cute in the window.

Two of the culprits looking all cute in the window.

MIT OCW Documentary Photography Class — Documentary Photo Project — Final

The assignment description from the course:

Documentary Photo Project
Each of you will be required to plan and carryout a documentary photo project. You may select your own subject – subject to my approval, but I would urge that you not take on anything too grandiose. I would suggest that you begin looking for a subject close to home, considering, for instance:

Life on your dorm floor
A fraternity weekend, or life in a fraternity
A day-week-month in a local laundromat
The work of a scientist, or lab
The activities of a campus group or organization
On the other hand, you may push the envelop as far as you dare – If you can gain access to a group of people, or an organization, whose lives or functioning we normally never see, go for it. But remember, to paraphrase Susan Meiselas:

“Faraway is not a place.”

And even more important, remember that there is one thing that you owe your subjects, be they your roommates or a group of developmentally disabled adults –

Honesty: Honesty in your vision; honesty in what you tell your subjects about your project and its purpose; honesty in your approach to your subject; and honesty in what you present to your viewers.

Your finished project will consist of 15-30 photographs, and 1500-2000 words of explanatory text. The text and photographs should, together, present the uninitiated with an understandable, engaging, ‘picture’ of your subject, but the writing and the photos should each stand on their own.



Ghost Bikes in the Santa Fe Area

The origin of the “ghost bike” is unknown. It may have come from Provo, a Dutch counterculture and anarchist movement in the mid-1960s. The name is derived from the Dutch word provoceren, meaning to provoke, based on their non-violent provocation of police to violent reaction. The political wing of the Provos developed White Plans to address social problems in Amsterdam. One such plan, the White Bicycle Plan, was introduced to the Municipal Council of the City of Amsterdam in 1967 by social inventor, industrial designer, entrepreneur, and politician Luud Schimmelpennink, but it failed to get the needed political support.

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

The Provos forged ahead any way and provided about 50, free to use, specially painted white bikes which they scattered around the city of Amsterdam. Many were stolen or tossed into the canals and the police impounded the rest as they violated a law forbidding citizens to leave bikes unlocked. After the bikes were released, the Provos equipped them with combination locks and painted the combinations on the bicycles, similar to the name, birth date, and the date of the accident or death painted on the frames of contemporary ghost bikes. (1)

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

Another theory about ghost bike origins is that it stems from a project by San Francisco artist Jo Slota. His project focused on the ghosts of bikes, those still locked but stripped of any useful parts, often with only the frame and maybe a single rim remaining. In 2002, he began painting them white and posting photographs on his website, ghostbike.net. As he puts it, “I see them as ‘dead bikes’ and paint their skeletal remains to emphasize their ghostlike quality.” (2)

Scott Dwane Lane, 1956-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Scott Dwane Lane, 1956-2012, Albuquerque, NM

The earliest known ghost bike, in the current sense of an accident marker or memorial, was placed in St. Louis, Missouri in October 2003 by Patrick Van Der Tuin. He saw a motorist strike a bicyclist in the bike lane on Holly Hills Boulevard and placed a white-painted bicycle at the accident location with a sign reading “Cyclist Struck Here”. After seeing the change in drivers’ behavior he and friends placed 15 more ghost bikes where cyclists had recently been hit by automobiles. The idea caught on and spread to other cities in the United States in the mid 2000s. It has since become a global phenomenon in dozens of countries from Austria to Uruguay. (3)

Michael Ryan, 1953-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Michael Ryan, 1953-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Until recently, I was only aware of ghost bikes in a general way. I had noticed one exiting onto Lomas Boulevard From I-25 in Albuquerque, but I hadn’t really considered them as distinct from the hundreds of other descansos one might see on the side of the road in northern New Mexico.

Scott Dwane Lane, 1956-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Scott Dwane Lane, 1956-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Historically, a descanso is a place where bearers in a funeral procession pause to rest and put down their burden between the church and the cemetery. This spot was often marked as a “descanso”; literally, a “resting place”. Later, its meaning changed to mean a marker or memorial placed at the site of a death on a road or highway. In this way, a ghost bike is a form of descanso – a subset specific to bicyclists.

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

My first real encounter with a ghost bike was Amy Marie Jobe’s memorial in Pojoaque, NM during the last week of March 2014. I was pressed for time and looking for anything visually interesting for the 52 Cameras Project. I spotted a bicycle near a shuttered Allsups on U.S. Route 285/84 on my way to Los Alamos from Santa Fe. I exited onto the frontage road, stopped, and pulled out the camera of the week, an old Polaroid (a scan of the negative is the first photo in this essay). The bike was pretty spartan as roadside memorials go, but it was definitely a ghost bike.

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Amy Jobe was only 16 when she was hit while crossing the road to use the pay phone at the Allsups. The driver was not charged in the accident. I wasn’t there so that’s not a judgement, just a statement of fact. Since the accident in 1999, there have been safety improvements in the area. The former highway lane is now a frontage road; separated from the new highway by concrete barriers. (4)

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Amy Marie Jobe, 1983-1999, Pojoaque, NM

Some time between April and December of 2014, the bike was spruced up with new paint or a good cleaning, the replacement of flowers, and the addition of some jewelry. It’s as pretty as the photos I’ve seen from the dedication ceremony. Weeds and grass had grown up around it again by the fall so it will require a little maintenance in the spring. Her bike has been a photographic subject for me twice and my research has shown me a face and a young life lost. It’s more than just a ghost bike as a photographic subject to me now. I’ll stop by and pull some weeds.

Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

As I’ve researched, it seems to me that ghost bikes serve several purposes. First, like a descanso, they are a memorial to a friend or loved one who has died. From what I’ve seen, photos are rare but this one at Matt Trujillo’s memorial is nice. Not everyone has the time or inclination to do their own research into a specific memorial. A picture humanizes the ghost bike. It’s no longer “somebody died here” but “Matt Trujillo, a human being known and loved by other human beings, died here”.

Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

Next, they are a way of focusing motorists’ attention on sharing the road with bicyclists. I hate to put it in this trite form but I can’t think of a better way: Nothing can bring Paula Higgins back but if her memorial makes one person slow down and look around, maybe her death can benefit others. The city of Albuquerque did make the bicycle crossing symbols larger and more visible, even if they did it on the cheap and left the previous symbols underneath.

Michael Ryan, 1953-2012, Albuquerque, NM

Michael Ryan, 1953-2012, Albuquerque, NM

In a similar way, they also remind cyclists to be aware and ride defensively.

Stencil street art, San Francisco, CA

Stencil street art, San Francisco, CA

Lastly, I think ghost bikes bring a cultural awareness that far too many people die needlessly on the road. Hopefully, this awareness can be expanded to encompass pedestrians as well. “Right of Way | Direct Action Street Justice” has done this with their stencil art (5) and the ghost bikes of “The NYC Street Memorial Project”. This stencil is in San Francisco, CA.

Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

Based on a do-it-yourself guide in the NYC Street Memorial Project’s 2014 press kit (6), a WikiHow article on painting a bike frame (7), and my own experience repainting bicycles, the actual construction of a ghost bike is fairly straightforward:

  • Strip the bike of non-essential parts (grips or tape, cables, brakes) and reuse or recycle them. This makes the bike easier to paint and less attractive to thieves.
  • Degrease and clean the bike.
  • Apply primer, at least two coats of flat, white paint, and maybe a clear coat or two of lacquer. You want your memorial to last and be able to endure the weather.
  • Depending on the location, you may need a lock or a chain and some rebar or other support if there isn’t a rail or a post to secure the bike.
  • If the information about the person isn’t painted directly on the bike, you’ll also need a well-secured sign or placard.
David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

The purple stickers on the bikes placed by the Duke City Wheelmen Foundation are a nice touch to let people know who put the effort into constructing the memorial. If you aren’t a close friend or relative, perhaps it’s best to leave placement of flowers, mementos, and personal items to those who are. A dedication ceremony helps – for closure, for publicity, and to give the community a sense of ownership and responsibility.

Roy Sekreta, 1964-2008, Albuquerque, NM

Roy Sekreta, 1964-2008, Albuquerque, NM

Dealing with local authorities about placing a bike can be another matter entirely. The ghost bike memorializing Roy Sekreta on Comanche Boulevard in Albuquerque disappeared shortly after it was installed in 2008. As reported by KOAT news, a city spokesman said officials decided to take the ghost bike down due to safety concerns. (8) According to ghostbikes.org, the current ghost bike is the third one, the previous two having been removed by the city. (9)

Roy Sekreta, 1964-2008, Albuquerque, NM

Roy Sekreta, 1964-2008, Albuquerque, NM

Like New York City, Albuquerque can be a slow moving entity but at least there is a wide bike lane on Comanche Blvd. and there are now clear, bright signs marking the area where the trail crosses the street. Moving the memorial from the median to the south side of the street next to the bike trail seems to have been acceptable to the city and it hasn’t been disturbed again.

David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

North of Albuquerque, there is a longer tradition of roadside memorials and thankfully, there are fewer ghost bikes. David Sciera’s ghost bike is in the median of New Mexico 599 (Veterans’ Memorial Highway), the bypass around Santa Fe, and there have been no complaints that I’m aware of, no vandalism, and no removal.

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

Traffic safety is less of a concern with the location of Forrest Fukushima’s ghost bike. It is well off the road at Totavi on NM 502 between Pojoaque and Los Alamos and if you blink during the commute, you might miss it.

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

Forrest S. Fukushima, 1966-1986, Totavi, NM

He was 20 and training for an “Iron Horse” competition in 1986 when he died. Alex Naranjo, her blood alcohol level over twice the legal limit of .08 percent (.18), had a blowout and struck him with her car. Over fifty of his friends and relatives gathered to remember him in 2014 when his ghost bike was dedicated. Alex Naranjo is now a municipal judge in Española, NM. (10)

Chris Ore, 1958-1999, Albuquerque, NM

Chris Ore, 1958-1999, Albuquerque, NM

The NYC Street Memorial Project’s mission statement (6) is a good summation of the cultural awareness that needs to be fostered. It also shows how governments sometimes have to be forced into doing the right thing and just how much work remains to be done.

NYC Street Memorial Project’s mission statement:

WHAT DO WE WANT?

Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

We want a change in culture.

  • To encourage mutual respect among all street users.
  • To instill in each person the responsibility we share to look out for each other.
Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

Matt Trujillo, 1974-2011, Albuquerque, NM

We want to incite more humanity in this city.

  • To assure that every person is remembered.
  • To build solidarity among non-drivers and create a space for mourning and support.
  • To acknowledge each death as a tragic, but not isolated, event.
  • To recognize the ripple effect that one person’s death has on their family, neighborhood, and community, and to acknowledge that the loss of one life affects us all.
Multi-use trail near Roy Sekreta's memorial on Comanche Boulevard in Albuquerque, NM

Multi-use trail near Roy Sekreta’s memorial on Comanche Boulevard in Albuquerque, NM

We want improvements in policy.

  • To make the City follow through on necessary improvements in engineering, enforcement, and public education.
  • To compel the City to conduct full investigations of crashes and their causes and to take action to improve safety.
Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

Paula L. Higgins, 1959-2006, Albuquerque, NM

We want outrage that makes a lasting difference.

  • To encourage the media to report on all deaths in a sensitive, educated manner.
  • To hold the City accountable for street safety issues and to force each agency to respond to these preventable tragedies.
  • To inspire all New Yorkers to be grieved and angered when someone is killed.
David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

David Sciera, 1971-1998, Santa Fe, NM

We want to stop having to do this.



(1) 2 January 2015. “Provo (movement)”. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(2) Slota, Jo (July 2005). “Ghost Bike – An art chronicle by Jo Slota”. http://ghostbike.net/. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(3) 4 December 2014. “Ghost bike”. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(4) Khal (21 February 2011). “Traffic Justice, Two Views”. Los Alamos Bikes. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(5) 2 January 2015. “Right of Way | Direct Action Street Justice”. rightofway.org. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(6) 2 January 2015. “The New York City Street Memorial Project”. The New York City Street Memorial Project. Retrieved 17 January 2015. (Link is to a PDF file).

(7) 5 January 2015. “How to Paint a Bike: 13 Steps – wikiHow”. wikiHow. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(8) 28 February 2010. “Ghost Bike Memorials Vanishing From Roadways”. KOAT. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(9) “Roy Sekreta | ghost bikes”. ghostbikes.org. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

(10) DeRoma, Tris (19 July 2014). “Remembering Forrest”. Los Alamos Monitor. Retrieved 17 January 2015.


Dave notes:

None of the example projects have citations and I can’t ask an instructor so I’ll explain here. My bachelor’s is from a liberal arts college so I’m used to using MLA. Proper citation uses too much space in a blog format so I used a wiki-style numbering scheme instead of a full Author, Title, Print Version, Electronic Version, Access Information format.

I didn’t count quoting the NYC Street Memorial Project‘s mission statement toward the assignment’s required word count.