52 Cameras: Camera 62 part 2 –Apple iPhone 4S

I usually have a camera with me but not always. I probably wouldn’t have walked back to the car to get a camera for the transformer warning label. I didn’t have to — I had my phone. I have a huge collection of fails and random, funny stuff because of my phone.

At the burlesque show, photography wasn’t allowed (always respect no-photography rules unless it’s some politician doing a perp-walk). At the end they said, “What the heck”, and all of the performers posed for the audience. I didn’t take a camera into the show but waddayaknow, I had my phone.

The Photojojo lenses are fun but not as handy as the phone. I have started keeping them in the glove compartment.

Photojojo fisheye -- It's Jem the cat, not a wombat.

Photojojo fisheye — It’s Jem the cat, not a wombat.

Warning label on a transformer.

Warning label on a transformer.

Photojojo wide-angle.  Center Market in Española, NM.

Photojojo wide-angle. Center Market in Española, NM.

Photojojo macro.  A plant in our yard.  Razor thin depth of field.

Photojojo macro. A plant in our yard. Razor thin depth of field.

52 Cameras: Camera 61 part 2 –Nikon One Touch (L35AF2)

Some grain from the old Kodak 400 film but not bad. Processed in Unicolor C-41 and scanned on the Canoscan 9000f at 4800DPI. Slight color tweaks and resized for upload.

The last big snow of the season?

The last big snow of the season?

Wagon wheel at a motel on Cerrillos Road.

Wagon wheel at a motel on Cerrillos Road.

Tattoo space for rent.

Tattoo space for rent.

Black Mesa silhouette.

Black Mesa silhouette.

Cruising downtown.

Cruising downtown.

I still have trouble maintaining proper temperature but color processing is getting a little easier.

52 Cameras: Camera 60 part 2 – Minolta Instant Pro

This is a cool camera. The images I’ve gotten so far are kind of funky. Exposure and focus are pretty good but the color balance is nuts. I think it’s the expired Impossible Project film — every batch gets better but it still doesn’t have the stability or shelf life that Polaroid’s integral films had. Yet. Scanned on a 600DPI Canon MF8350, straightened, and cropped.

Zoe on her bed.  No special features used.  It's a catnip cigar ya perv.

Zoe on her bed. No special features used. It’s a catnip cigar ya perv.

Color balance and levels.  To get enough red to make her fur the right color, the wall is red too.

Color balance and levels. To get enough red to make her fur the right color, the wall is red too.

30 second long exposure and a laser pointer.

30 second long exposure and a laser pointer.

This is more like what I saw.  Happy Valentine's Day!

This is more like what I saw. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Close up lens.  Darkened a bit.  Some are yellow and some are white but it wasn't captured.

Close up lens. Darkened a bit. Some are yellow and some are white but it wasn’t captured.

A gloomy day and I let some light hit the print trying to get it into my pocket.

A gloomy day and I let some light hit the print trying to get it into my pocket.

Converting to B&W with a digital infrared filter makes a creepy image.

Converting to B&W with a digital infrared filter makes a creepy image.

Minolta Maxxum 7000 Film Transport Check

A viewer on the 52 Cameras channel on Youtube has a Maxxum and the film counter stays at ‘0’. I ran through a few checks on mine that might be helpful.

First, the easy stuff — check that the batteries are fresh and making good contact. The LCD can be on when there’s not enough juice to run the film transport motor. LCDs are very low power compared to motors. Some people recommend against it, but I’ve had good results cleaning battery contacts with a pencil eraser. If the contacts are really corroded, take off the battery holder, take out the batteries, and soak the holder in white vinegar. When it stops bubbling, rinse it off, dry it thoroughly, and try again.

Page 16 from the manual says to turn the camera on before loading the film.

Page 16 from the manual says to turn the camera on before loading the film.

If the film isn't laying flat, it may not engage the teeth on the sprocket.

If the film isn’t laying flat, it may not engage the teeth on the sprocket.

Make sure the rewind switch is pushed back to the right.  It's  not dangerous, I'm just pointing with a straw.

Make sure the rewind switch is pushed back to the right. It’s not dangerous, I’m just pointing with a straw.

The hook that holds the back closed also hits a switch that tells the camera the back is shut.

The hook that holds the back closed also hits a switch that tells the camera the back is shut.

When you push it in, the camera thinks the back is closed.

When you push it in, the camera thinks the back is closed.

Open the back, turn the camera on, and push the back catch with something small like my trusty cocktail straw. Watch the sprocket — it should turn. With no film, my camera tries four times. You’ll need to push the button and slide the back release down so you can close the back again.

Last, there is a little roller on the inside of the camera back. It should turn freely so it will hold the film against the take-up spool.

That’s it for checking and verifying things I can think of. If anyone has more tips, please chime in in the Youtube comments. I was invaded by spambots and had to turn comments off on the blog.

The 52 Cameras Maxxum 7000 video link.

Worst case, check Etsy, shopgoodwill.com or that online auction site. Maxxums are still really cheap.

52 Cameras: Camera 59 part 2 – Lomography Supersampler

Thanks Bill!

As far as treating this like an experiment, I did pretty much everything wrong. I had nothing but variables.

I used a camera I’d never used before.

It was loaded with unknown el-cheapo 400 film that came with the camera. The label, including the DX coding, was a sticker. It wasn’t even Lomo-branded, just a sticker.

I’d never processed color print film before so saying I’d never used the chemicals (Unicolor C-41 kit) before is kind of redundant.

Just to be a complete fool, I used a reel and tank I’d never used before too. It’s a Paterson set I got from Goodwill. The plastic reel is almost the same as the Yankee I used for the 120 B&W but I had a heck of a time getting it loaded in the dark bag. And, of course, the tank lid leaked like a $#@! when I inverted it.

I also ignored the camera manual where it says not to bother using it indoors. I tried to catch the cats in action in the house and got a whole lot of nothing.

Astonishingly, I got 11 frames with something on them. Eight of them are even reasonably well exposed.

Here are three with a wee bit of visual interest.

A bird was flying by but I was too slow on the draw.  I like the trees any way.

A bird was flying by but I was too slow on the draw. I like the trees any way.

He's not driving backwards -- I stuck the camera out the window as I passed.

He’s not driving backwards — I stuck the camera out the window as I passed.

Next door raven shot through the living room window.

Next door raven shot through the living room window.

Some crops from the raven photo.

Raven1

Raven2

Raven3

Raven4

There is a lot of exposure variation from lens to lens but that’s part of the adventure with strange, cheap cameras. It’s a lot of fun to use so we’re already burning through another roll. Negatives scanned at 4800DPI on a Canoscan 9000f and resized for upload. Straightened, cropped, and a small color tweak in Photoshop.



Processing notes:
Based on what I’ve learned from processing this roll, the next one will get a rinse between the developer and blix. I’ll also do a post-stabilizer rinse and Photoflo — there were a lot of water spots. I’ll practice with the Paterson reel and use the Yankee if it’s hosed. I may use the Yankee tank any way since it doesn’t leak. I need to get some small containers so it’s easier to keep track of the age of the chemicals.