Phound Photos Volume 5

I bought a Kodak Instamatic 104 as part of a camera lot and it came with a Kodachrome-64 cartridge. I had tried processing Kodachrome as black and white before but got nothing. I tried again using Kodak HC-110 and Ilford Rapid Fixer and the film had some retrievable images.

Christmas portrait.

Christmas portrait.

Looks a bit like Richard Karn as Al on "Home Improvement".

Looks a bit like Richard Karn as Al on “Home Improvement”.

Another Eastern Air Lines photo.

Another Eastern Air Lines photo.

Nice hat.

Nice hat.

Palm trees.  Makes sense -- Eastern was headquartered in Miami.

Palm trees. Makes sense — Eastern was headquartered in Miami.

The camera itself isn’t any help dating these images. The Instamatic 104 was made from 1965 to 1968. Kodachrome 64 in 126 format was made from 1974 to 1993. That at least sets an early limit — the photos are from no earlier than 1974. Eastern Air Lines went out of business in 1991 so that more or less sets an upper date limit. Going by hair and clothing styles, I’d guess late 70s or early 80s.

Processing Kodachrome as black and white creates really dense negatives, even after removing the anti-halation layer. I didn’t have to do anything special to get the remjet off — a pre-wash did most of the work and an extra-thorough rinse at the end did the rest. The negatives are also really orange which is why the digitally inverted negatives are blue.

My scanner couldn’t transmit enough light through the negatives to get anything useful. Even normal use of a slide projector wasn’t bright enough. I ended up putting individual negatives in a slide frame (Kodachrome is also really thick and really curly) and taping it over the front of the slide projector lens. I used macro mode on the Nikon AW100 to photograph the negatives. I shot at an angle so the pattern of the bulb didn’t show through and de-skewed in Photoshop. The light wasn’t consistent across the frame so there is some vignetting, showing as a lighter halo when the images were inverted.

I found a couple of articles about bleaching the negatives using C-41 bleach or fixer with ascorbic acid. I’ll try that when I can and add results here.

Developing notes:

All except running water rinses at 20C/68F. Yankee tank with 2 adjustable reels using just the lower reel. Any 35mm setup will work. 126 is the same width with different perforations.

For the pre-wash, I ball-parked 68F using my finger under the tap and ran water into the tank for 2 minutes. A lot of yellow water with black flecks came out at first. Drained and set the timer for developing.

Kodak HC-110 dilution H. H is an unofficial dilution. It’s 1/2 strength dilution B for twice the time. 1 part developer to 63 parts water. Instructions say to use at least 6mL of developer per roll so I used 6mL developer syrup and 378mL water to get the right ratio (total developer solution = 384mL). Continuous inversions for the first minute and then 15 seconds of inversions every 3 minutes for a total of 20 minutes. Drained and got more yellow liquid and black flecks.

Kodak Indicator stop bath mixed at a strength of 16mL/L (5-6mL for 340mL). 2 inversions and then sit for 1 minute. Drained pretty clear. I never reuse the stop so I don’t use the indicator. I’ll have to reuse some just so I know what the indicator color change looks like.

If I was going to reuse the fixer, I’d add a rinse here. I wasn’t so I didn’t.

Ilford Rapid Fixer mixed 1:4 (68mL fix + 272mL water for 340mL). Same inversions (agitation) as the developer for a total of 15 minutes. Drained pretty clear.

I sometimes use the temperature control bath water for rinsing if I’m sure I didn’t get any chemicals in it. It’s already at the right temperature. I filled the tank and inverted 5 times and emptied it. Refill, invert 10X, empty, and then the same with 20X inversions. I usually stop rinsing here but I was concerned about the remjet backing so I added ~3 minutes under running water to be sure.

After the rinse, I added a few drops of Kodak Photo-Flo, refilled the tank with water, inverted a few times to make it nice and foamy, drained, squeegeed with my fingers, and hung it to dry.

52 Cameras: Camera 101 — Ansco Cadet Disc100

Even at 4800DPI, these are small negatives to work with. The vintage of the film — Kodak was the last holdout and gave up in 1999 — doesn’t help. This disc (using the preferred spelling for the film format) is Fuji. No idea when it expired.

On the Sandstone Bluffs at El Malpais National Monument.

On the Sandstone Bluffs at El Malpais National Monument.

My sweetie.

My sweetie.

Not checking texts, she was taking photos of the evaporating pools.

Not checking texts, she was taking photos of the evaporating pools.

On the way to the arch.

On the way to the arch.

Random stuff for 6 May 2016

While I finish a roll in the current camera I’ve been scanning manuals in the evenings. I’ve had a stack of other stuff to scan forever so since I have it fired up without the film adapter…

A scan of my Bernie Sanders bumper sticker.  Thanks Mom!

A scan of my Bernie Sanders bumper sticker. Thanks Mom!

Me and M's first real date.  My friend Ellen scored us tickets.

Me and M’s first real date. My friend Ellen scored us tickets.

Kinda looks like my sweetie.

Out of print but still available from Poster Pop.  Thanks Mike!

Out of print but still available from Poster Pop. Thanks Mike!

52 Cameras: Camera 99 part 2 — Polaroid CU-5 Pinhole

Thanks to the folks at Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day for getting me started in another addictive diversion.

1200DPI scans on a CanoScan 9000f. I scanned in color and decided to leave them that way.

The scanned images in the video and the ones posted here are unedited except for resizing. The negative scans had levels adjusted before reversing to positive. It’s kind of a cool effect doing it that way — I just have to reverse my thinking to imagine what it will look like.

Socorro Peak from the Socorro Holiday Inn Express.

Socorro Peak from the Socorro Holiday Inn Express.

I haven’t scanned the Socorro Peak negative yet. I put it between two pieces of paper to protect it not realizing it still had wet developer goo on it. I washed off some of the emulsion with the glued-on paper.

Negative from my test shot.  It's grainier but the boosted contrast really adds something.

Negative from my test shot. It’s grainier but the boosted contrast really adds something.

The tire swing.  Not bad for a pinhole but kind of "meh".

The tire swing. Not bad for a pinhole but kind of “meh”.

Tire swing negative.  The grain and contrast give it a melancholy feel.

Tire swing negative. The grain and contrast give it a melancholy feel.

Curly grass in the back yard.

Curly grass in the back yard.

Curly grass negative.

Curly grass negative.

Some people have gotten sharp images using pinhole cameras. I’m not there yet. I’m going to try more experiments and not wait until the week before next year’s Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day to cobble something together.

52 Cameras: Camera 98 part 2 — Fujica STX-1

This is the Konica film I split between the Minolta SR-T 200 and this Fujica. They did a study that showed new parents took more pictures than any other amateur photographers. I get it, target the people buying film, but did they really change the film or just the marketing?

Film Bebe.

Film Bebe.

Slightly expired Fuji Superia 400 film. It’s been cloudy so the extra speed was nice. I bought it before it expired and froze it so it’s in good shape. Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

Quiet, writer at work.

Quiet, writer at work.

Rosaries at Loretto Chapel in Santa Fe.

Rosaries at Loretto Chapel in Santa Fe.

Blossoms in the yard.

Blossoms in the yard.

Three horses and a donkey in La Mesilla.

Three horses and a donkey in La Mesilla.