Monthly Archives: April 2014

52 Cameras: Week 34 part 1 — Canon EOS 620

Well, the 3rd roll was a bust. That’s the risk using expired film.

This is from the 1st roll I shot with this camera. I used a Canon 50mm/1.8. The “II” version with the plastic mount. No idea of the settings. I scanned the print. Negatives are buried in a box somewhere.

Jem coming and going.

Jem coming and going.

The 2nd roll was expired (02/2003) ISO 800 Kodak Max. Between the film grain, age grain, and scanner noise (had it done at processing) there wasn’t much to work with. I’ll rescan the negatives Sunday or Monday and see if I can improve what I have. Sigma 70-300mm. No-name 2X extender on the moon images.

Lunar eclipse.

Lunar eclipse.

Lunar eclipse -- blood moon.

Lunar eclipse — blood moon.

Near Pojoaque.

Near Pojoaque.

Near Pojoaque.

Near Pojoaque.

These 2nd roll images have way too much noise reduction applied. I’ll update after the negative scan.

52 Cameras: Week 33 part 2 — Kodak Bantam Special

It turns out the B&H 828 film isn’t cut down 120 roll film, it’s 35mm (135) spooled with backing paper. Because 828’s frame size is 40×28 mm vs. 36×24 mm for 35mm film, the image overlays the upper sprocket holes. 828 had a single index hole per frame on the bottom so the image on 35mm film is above the bottom sprockets. The Bantam Special has the film index hole sensor. You push a button to retract it and then let it go so it can fall into the next frame’s hole. I expected a smooth roll (120 has no holes) so I used the counter window and ignored the button. I thought the camera was having advance problems but it was hanging up on the sprocket holes. I got a partial frame on one shot and two frames that overlap by about a third.

Processing by Visions Photo Lab.

828 is an 8-frame-per-roll format but I’m posting a few more images than usual. I want to show the sprocket holes and other details. All are scanned to TIFFs on the CanoScan 9000f, 4800 DPI, millions of colors unless otherwise noted.

Not a great photo but if I crop out the cardboard it’ll be nice.

Buddha, f/2 @ 1/25 sec.

Buddha, f/2 @ 1/25 sec.

Both images were scanned using Image Capture.app. The software takes the selected area into account when determining the exposure so they’re a little different — the sprocket holes are black-black. I suspended the film in the 120 holder to get the holes.

Same shot with sprockets.

Same shot with sprockets.

A nice thing about B&W process B&W film is that scanning in color gives a nice sepia tone. Color process is convenient but the emulsion is orange.

Double exposure.  Was I doing shoot and wind or wind and shoot?  The index sensor is a useful thing.

Double exposure. Was I doing shoot and wind or wind and shoot? The index sensor is a useful thing.

Nice bokeh.  I don't remember the shutter but this was at f/2.

Nice bokeh. I don’t remember the shutter but this was at f/2.

Same image with a straight gray scale conversion (saturation slider all the way to the left in Preview.app).

Same image with a straight gray scale conversion (saturation slider all the way to the left in Preview.app).

This was scanned directly to B&W using Canon’s Scan Gear software.

Omega Bridge, f/16 @ 1/250.

Omega Bridge, f/16 @ 1/250.

I got a yellow cloud filter in the case with the camera. It really makes the clouds pop. Scanned to B&W with Scan Gear.

Storm Clouds, f/16 @ 1/250.

Storm Clouds, f/16 @ 1/250.

I have a second spool now, some nice 120 film, and a cigar cutter. I can’t wait to shoot more with this camera!

52 Cameras: Week 32 part 2 — Nikon FG

I know I say it a lot but I really like this camera. This post has one of each of the ways you can shoot with it. The wire is programmed auto exposure — all I had to do was focus. The landscape is manual and the last one is aperture priority at f/1.8.

Expired Walgreen’s color print film, ISO 200. Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

I like the shape of this wire hanging from the power line near my house -- it looks like a little scribble-dude hanging on for dear life..

I like the shape of this wire hanging from the power line near my house — it looks like a little scribble-dude hanging on for dear life.

Storm clouds looking east towards the Sangre De Cristos.

Storm clouds looking east towards the Sangre De Cristos.

My sweetie at Thai Café.

My sweetie at Thai Café.

52 Cameras: Week 31 part 2 — Polaroid Automatic Land Camera 250

Another fun camera. ISO 3000 film takes some getting used to. Scanned on the CanoScan 9000f using Image Capture.app and Canon’s TWAIN driver. 4800DPI TIFF in millions of colors. Resized to 5% and converted to JPEG for upload.

The trucks are behind a chain link fence so the challenge was getting the lens through one of the holes without messing up the framing or blocking the shutter release.

Old fire truck in La Puebla - Fuji FP100C film.

Old fire truck in La Puebla – Fuji FP100C film.

Another old fire truck in La Puebla - Fuji FP100C film.

Another old fire truck in La Puebla – Fuji FP100C film.

I’m not sure what I did here. I think I left the camera on the indoor setting. The flares work since it’s a ghost bike.

Ghost bike in Pojoaque -- Fuji FP3000B film.

Ghost bike in Pojoaque — Fuji FP3000B film.

This was an experiment. I used a portrait lens made for a Polaroid 100. I measured the distance since the rangefinder adapter doesn’t fit the 250. It would have been good but I was too close to the electronic flash. My hand and the cat’s butt are properly exposed.

Self portrait with Zoe -- Fuji FP3000B film.

Self portrait with Zoe — Fuji FP3000B film.

I scanned negatives so I’ll do another post with strange results from that experiment.