Monthly Archives: June 2019

Phound Photos Volume 13

Kodak Max 400 found in a Canon Sure Shot Ace. The film canister doesn’t give any clues about the date. The camera is from 1988.

Some young ladies having fun trying on prom(?) dresses.

Weird to think they're probably in their 40s now.

Weird to think they’re probably in their 40s now.


The film was horrendously jammed. With a good battery, the film wouldn’t rewind and it was at the end of the roll so it couldn’t wind either.
Double exposure

Double exposure


The extra exposure from the back being opened created what looks like the Sabattier effect.

The extra exposure from the back being opened created what looks like the Sabattier effect.


An even more extreme example of the effect.

An even more extreme example of the effect.


Cropping out the overexposure and a little tweaking of levels and this could be a nice image.

Cropping out the overexposure and a little tweaking of levels and this could be a nice image.


There are twelve frames with something. A few of those are salvageable as “normal” images. To get the film out, I had to work in the dark bag and cut it loose from the canister. Then I was able to feed it around the take-up spool in the wind direction until it separated from the spool.

    Some notes & random thoughts

  • The film has a really pronounced curl along its length so it was difficult to get it into the scanner. While researching how to get rid of the curl, I came across a suggestion to iron it. I used a black portion of the film to try it. I did about five seconds and the film picked up the texture of the cotton cloth (old summer-weight PJs, not textured) and the table beneath it. I do not recommend ironing curly film. By inserting the film emulsion down, apex of curl up (opposite Canon’s directions), I was able to get the film holder to make it flat enough to scan. It’s easy to flip the images in post. The scans are OK but the film is in a sleeve inside a large hardcover book. I’m curious how long it will take to flatten. I found some wrinkly manuals I’d put in there maybe a year ago (and forgotten) and they look great.
  • I really want to experiment and figure out how the pseudo-solarization came about and repeat it on purpose. On the first yellow image above, I think the left part was on the spool towards the back of the camera and the image was increasingly shielded by the take up spool as you move right. The same for the rotated portrait format image. I’m guessing the landscape one was a lower frame number so it was more shielded. I’ll have to check the numbers. That the effect is yellow is a good starting point for reproducing the effect. Exposed through orange tinted backing, yellow’s RGB complement… I have a lot of research to do.
  • The camera is a little weird and kind of cool for an f/3.5 wide angle P&S from the 1980s. It has an “Easy Viewer”, a low-angle viewfinder like the Photura, and the left side slides off to become an infrared remote. I have a battery and some dead film for transport testing. If it works, I’ll shoot with it and feature it soon.

52 Cameras: # 178 — Ricoh XR-2s




This is the same Kodak High Contrast Copy Film I tested in the Nikon FA. Beautiful but challenging stuff. I shot ~ 1/2 roll and got 13 images. Not 13 subjects since I was bracketing. With the film speed all the way down to ISO 12, the XR-2s doesn’t allow exposure compensation so some I shot at Auto (aperture priority) ISO 12 and some in metered manual at ISO 6. Developed in HC-110 dilution H for 11.5 minutes. Still too much agitation so I had to crop in a bit to avoid the over-development near the sprocket holes.
Pot & rock: f/8 at 1/2 second

Pot & rock: f/8 at 1/2 second


Watering can on stump: f/4 at 1/15

Watering can on stump: f/4 at 1/15


Agave: f/2.8 at 1/8

Agave: f/2.8 at 1/8


A fun bit of history – the receipt for the zoom lens in the kit.
In 1982, the Tokina zoom was HK$700 from Liu's Camera & Radio

In 1982, the Tokina zoom was HK$700 from Liu’s Camera & Radio


This was during the period when the Hong Kong Dollar had a floating value in relation to the US Dollar. According to the Federal Reserve, the exchange on 16 August 1982 was HK$ 6.1350 to 1 US$. The lens was the equivalent of US$114. But, a 1982 US$ is worth US$2.67 today so the lens was the equivalent of US$304. For a constant aperture 100-300mm zoom, that’s a pretty good deal.