52 Cameras: # 162 — Nikon FM

    Things I forgot in the video:

  • The FM operates just fine without batteries — just with no metering.
  • The frame counter (36 max) is on the top deck just in front of the wind lever.
  • The LEDs in the viewfinder are used as a battery check.
  • Film speeds are from ISO 12 to 3200. Full stops are numbered (100, 200, …) with dots for 1/3 stop increments (e.g., 64 & 80 between 50 and 100).
  • Lift and turn the shutter speed knob to set the film speed.
  • The back can be removed for an instant or bulk film back.
  • The gallium photodiodes for metering are located in the eyepiece module rather than in the pentaprism. EV1 to EV18.
  • The meter is 60/40 center weighted — 60% given to the center 12mm and the remaining 40% to the rest of the image in the viewfinder.
  • No dedicated mirror lockup but it goes up when the self timer is used.

And… even reading the manual, I got the LED meanings wrong. + or means more than 1 stop off. Center dot and + or means 1/5 to 1 stop off.

From the manual.  Derp.

From the manual. Derp.


Film Photography Project’s “Retrochrome” is expired, cold-stored Kodak Extachrome. Ektachrome is pretty cool, color-wise, even when fresh.



Goober behind the screen.  Removed some blue.

Goober behind the screen. Removed some blue.


Dragon kite.  Removed some blue and bumped the saturation a little.

Dragon kite. Removed some blue and bumped the saturation a little.


Low fall sun through the leaves.  Color corrected and tweaked the levels.

Low fall sun through the leaves. Color corrected and tweaked the levels.


I added another image of Goober (2 versions) because it was a funny struggle to get the colors right. The white sheets were really cool (blue). I tried tons of different tweaks and it was either still too blue or over-corrected and orange. I played with filters while I decided whether to not use the image or just convert it to black and white. Most results were “meh” but I like this solarized one.

Solarized Goober.  Very black light poster.

Solarized Goober. Very black light poster.


Finally, just goofing around, I chose the “skin tone” filter. It’s supposed to correct skin tones that look wrong, usually because of lighting. I clicked the dropper icon on Goober’s face and, like magic, the colors in the image were right.

Goober's magical skin tone.

Goober’s magical skin tone.