Tag Archives: 120

52 Cameras: # 175 — Coronet Ambassador




Nice coverage by the old lens.  6X9cm is a lot of film.

Nice coverage by the old lens. 6X9cm is a lot of film.


This one is cropped & contrast tweaked - not sure if it was lens flare or a light leak.

This one is cropped & contrast tweaked – not sure if it was lens flare or a light leak.


I scanned at 4800DPI so it made some huge (20+MB) files. Preview.app on the laptop was really struggling to resize the images. The images displayed while the hamster wheel was working full blast are interesting.
Screen grab of the tree image in the video during resizing

Screen grab of the tree image in the video during resizing

52 Cameras: # 172 — Spartus Full-Vue




Made In Chicago Museum’s article on Spartus, Jack Galter, & the “Chicago Cluster”.

Boys’ Life from Google Books.

Boys' Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section

Boys’ Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section


You talkin' to me?

You talkin’ to me?


You talik' to ME?!

You talik’ to ME?!


Nope, just munching.

Nope, just munching.


Photographer's shadow

Photographer’s shadow


At first i thought I took this one but it has a frame number from before the bend in the film.
Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree - we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.

Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree – we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.


The whole Instax Mini frame

The whole Instax Mini frame

52 Cameras: # 168 — Franka Solida I




Kodak Tri-X 400, develop by 12/2016. I bought it new and it’s been frozen. Developed in HC-110 H (1+63) for 9 minutes at 68F. Scanned on the CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI. I used both Canon’s software and Vuescan and picked whichever version I liked better. The bird bath in the video is a merged image from both.
It's only fair -- I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura

It’s only fair — I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura


I think the vignetting is not entirely the camera’s fault. I was pretty close with 400 film and the Vivitar flash I used didn’t actually have the combination of speed and distance on its chart so I kind of winged it and used f/32.
The wedding bouquet after a few weeks

The wedding bouquet after a few weeks


The junk at the top is from over-agitating during development.
Playing with the double exposure

Playing with the double exposure


Zoomed in to clean up dust specks, I noticed Jem’s face in the branches (screen grab PNG).
Detail -- Jem The Cheshire Cat

Detail — Jem The Cheshire Cat

52 Cameras: # 149 — Meopta Milona




Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.

Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.


This was more of a "catch it falling off the post because I don't have a tripod" kind of deal.

This was more of a “catch it falling off the post because I don’t have a tripod” kind of deal.


And this was a "Did I wind?  I'm pretty sure I wound."  I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.

And this was a “Did I wind? I’m pretty sure I wound.” I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.


Did I really use film that wasn't expired?  I could be on to something!

Did I really use film that wasn’t expired? I could be on to something!


I was cleaning the office/workshop while the pigeons ferried buckets of bits to Youtube. Not able to find anything clean, but less dangerous. I discovered I had one unused frame in an Instax Mini. I loaded it by feel into the Milona inside the dark bag, shot it, and then put it back into the Instax for processing. I didn’t get it lined up quite right but not bad.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

52 Cameras: # 140 — Using the Ansco Readyflash & Spooling 620 Film

Using the Ansco Readyflash Part1: Spooling 620 Film

There are a lot of sites with instructions for paring down 120 spools instead of re-spooling. Give it a whirl if you don’t mind risking a roll. A couple of examples:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-120-Film-in-620-Era-cameras/
https://www.lomography.com/magazine/178618-how-to-modify-120-film-for-a-620-film-camera

One warning if you decide to go this route: The 620 film slot and the corresponding piece in the camera that turns it are smaller. Make sure the adapted roll is smooth on the ends and rotates freely. Otherwise, the bit inside the camera may rotate inside the slot of the film spool and break it. Filing the end of the spool makes it even weaker. See my experience using a 120 spool in a Rover (Diana) camera.



Using the Ansco Readyflash Part2: Loading & Shooting

Film Photography Project 620 film goodies: https://filmphotographystore.com/collections/all/620-film

52 Cameras: # 125 — Kodak Six-20

For lending me the camera — Thanks Dave!

Amazing collection of Kodak catalogs at Kodakcollector.com.

A clarification: The camera could be as late as 1934. The catalog years overlap — 1932-33, 1933-34, 1934-35. The 34-35 catalog is the first one to show the “Action Front” push button bed release. The 32-33 catalog is the only one that explicitly states the camera is available in black or brown but I don’t know if later model years had the color choice. If it is from 33-34, the doublet was the low-end lens with an f/6.3 or f/4.5 anastigmat as an upgrade and a Diodak shutter option which added 1/10 second to the speeds of the Kodon.



View of the Truchas Mountains.

View of the Truchas Mountains.

The scalloping at the top of the next image is from re-spooling the film. I didn’t have it perfectly parallel to the 620 spool rim so the film & paper came off at an angle and wrinkled.

No idea -- it looks like water.

No idea — it looks like water.

Taken with the tape and poster board seals. Still leaked.

Trinity in the sun.  Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity in the sun. Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity on the sun porch.  No leaks!

Trinity on the sun porch. No leaks!




That’s it for posted images taken with this camera. About the kludges follows.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Sketching out the "over bellows".

Sketching out the “over bellows”.

Getting the cardboard between the bellows and the folding front was a challenge. Good view of the aperture setting: U.S. 8=f/11, 16=f/16, 32=f/22, 64=f/32.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

I thought I was done here.

I thought I was done here.

The back is 6 X 9cm and the front is sized to let the Instax frame slide in.

Instax Mini adapter.

Instax Mini adapter.

I still got light leaks between the top and body. I tried yet more tape before giving up and shrouding the whole thing with my dark bag.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

I don’t have a proper darkroom so here’s the process. I taped up the Instax film box to use as a transfer station.

  1. Put the film in the box.
  2. The box and camera go into the dark bag. Remove the film, remove one frame from the cartridge, insert it in the holder in the camera, and put the cartridge back in the box.
  3. Meter, carefully take the camera out of the bag, and shroud everything but the lens and shutter trigger.
  4. Take the shot and put the camera back in the bag.
  5. Take the frame out of the holder, slide it back in the Instax cartridge, and put the cartridge in the light-tight box.
  6. Put the Instax camera in the bag, load the cartridge, take it out, cover the lens, and shoot it to run the print through the Instax rollers.

I got turned around a couple of times and loaded the Instax frame with the image side towards the lens. I burned through most of a box of 10 prints to get two OK images but it was still a lot cheaper and faster than using negative film (re-spool, reload, process) for each iteration.

52 Cameras: # 118 — Ansco Craftsman (1950)

Thanks Sonette!


Ansco also made a box camera ca. 1926 called the Craftsman No.2A.



Not a lot of images to show in addition to what’s in the video. Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros developed in Kodak HC-110.

Because the shutter is slow I used a Y2 filter (1 stop) for most of the shots on this roll. The yellow provides a nice contrast boost too.

I’m really impressed by the sharpness of the images. No post-processing other than resizing.

Zoe checking out the new-old rug for my office.

Zoe checking out the new-old rug for my office.

Lousy composition but I love the contrasts in aspen bark.

Lousy composition but I love the contrasts in aspen bark.

The neighbor's goats.

The neighbor’s goats.




I struck out trying to find a manual or information and had to find out for myself.

Checking the focal length
I taped the inside edge, where the film insert goes and marked the tape at the film plane.

Marking the film plane

Marking the film plane

Next I taped the lens inside so I wouldn’t scratch it with the calipers and put a thin piece of card stock along the film plane line.

Card stock to measure against the calipers

Card stock to measure against the calipers

The calipers have a post that sticks out as the jaws open allowing depth measurements.

90mm-ish

90mm-ish

Checking the aperture
You can see the aperture in front of the lens but behind the shutter.

Aperture

Aperture

The Play-Doh was covered in plastic food wrap as I held the shutter open with the stem from a cotton swab and pressed it into the aperture. I could have used about five hands for this operation. Thankfully, there isn’t glass in front of the shutter.

7mm-ish

7mm-ish

~90mm focal length / ~7mm diameter = ~f/13.

And then I found this ad. I need to re-find it on the web so I can give proper credit.

f/14

f/14

Checking the shutter speed
I set the Olympus to 240 frames per second and shot the shutter six times. In Quicktime, I counted frames from closed (pure black) to closed again. From my working notes:

Vid at 240 frames / second = 4.17 ms / frame

1. 14
2. 12
3. 12
4. 14
5. 12
6. 11
——
75 / 6 = 12.5 frames

12.5 x 4.17ms = 0.0521 seconds = ~ 5/100 = ~ 1/20 second avg.

fastest = 11 = ~ 4.6/100 = ~ 1/22
slowest = 14 = ~ 5.8/100 = ~ 1/17

Frame counter window

Frame counter window

The red window is bright and easy to read. Maybe too easy. The right edge of the aspen image and the top of the goats have some funky marks. It could be from processing. I’d need to shoot another roll doing frames with the window covered and uncovered to be sure.

Note to self: Cover the window on an old unknown camera unless that’s part of the test.

52 Cameras: # 95 — Rover (Diana) 620

I forgot to include a couple of things in the video. The Rover has 3 focus settings, 4-6 feet, 6-12 feet, and 12 feet to infinity. It also has a bulb setting. Bulb is a bit of a challenge since it has no cable release and no tripod socket.



I only got six shots on the first roll before the film jammed. A couple of examples are in the video.

Expired Kodak Ektar 100 film. Processed by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe and scanned on a CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI.

The view from our room at The Line in LA.  We paid for a view of the Hollywood Hills and it was foggy the whole time.

The view from our room at The Line in LA. We paid for a view of the Hollywood Hills and it was foggy the whole time.

Kodak Tri-X 400 developed in HC-110 and Ilford rapid fix. Scanned on a CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI.

"Urban Light" by Chris Burden at LACMA.

“Urban Light” by Chris Burden at LACMA.

My sweetie at Ray's & Stark Bar at LACMA.

My sweetie at Ray’s & Stark Bar at LACMA.

Palm tree and marble.

Palm tree and marble.

There's always construction in LA.

There’s always construction in LA.

Waterfall at the La Brea Tar Pits museum.

Waterfall at the La Brea Tar Pits museum.