Tag Archives: 35

52 Cameras: # 180 — Bolsey B2




I’ll start with an image that’s in the video. I just metered the scene without compensating for the strong back light. This is what I got:
Goober & Jem: un-adjusted

Goober & Jem: un-adjusted


Using the scanner adjustment to compensate. I can see them but the background is brighter (don’t care) and they look hazy (do care). This is the result:
Dragged the scanner software midtone on the histogram to 60 (default 128)

Dragged the scanner software midtone on the histogram to 60 (default 128)


I tried the Photoshop merge, the same wizard that let’s you create a panorama. It did not cover itself in glory. Several manual variations later, I came up with this:
Stacked the images as layers and played with transparency.  Then used the levels setting in Preview.

Stacked the images as layers and played with transparency. Then used the levels setting in Preview.


I may be able to get something better using layers with a selective erase (I got better results putting the darker layer one top and varying the transparency, which seems counter-intuitive to me) but I’m not sure it won’t look like modern HDR-that doesn’t look real images.

The film & the lens handle wide contrast ranges if you meter properly

The film & the lens handle wide contrast ranges if you meter properly


I have a scanner-brightened version of this too but I haven't tried exposure stacking.

I have a scanner-brightened version of this too but I haven’t tried exposure stacking.


I was trying to avoid cars in the frame and ended up with "Ladies & Gentlemen, St. Francis has left the building".

I was trying to avoid cars in the frame and ended up with “Ladies & Gentlemen, St. Francis has left the building”.

52 Cameras: # 179 — Time Magazine Promotional Camera




I wanted to shoot with this camera before I start modifying it and maybe destroy it completely. Plus, I got an unused roll of film in a camera bag that came with a camera. – some Kodak HD 400. No idea of its age or how it was stored so it’s ideal for a low-expectations camera.

Links mentioned in the video:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Upgrade-Your-Time-Magazine-Promotional-Camera/
https://collectiblend.com/Cameras/New-Taiwan/
1984 Time Magazine camera promo commercial

Most of the Time cameras have the fake motor drive bump out – mine doesn’t. This guy has the exact same camera, right down to the SN on the lens.

Some color tweaks and haze removal but that’s more the film than the camera.


Rug drying in Santa Fe

Rug drying in Santa Fe


Jem - a cat with a purpose

Jem – a cat with a purpose


Trinity's just trying to stay cool

Trinity’s just trying to stay cool

Phound Photos Volume 13

Kodak Max 400 found in a Canon Sure Shot Ace. The film canister doesn’t give any clues about the date. The camera is from 1988.

Some young ladies having fun trying on prom(?) dresses.

Weird to think they're probably in their 40s now.

Weird to think they’re probably in their 40s now.


The film was horrendously jammed. With a good battery, the film wouldn’t rewind and it was at the end of the roll so it couldn’t wind either.
Double exposure

Double exposure


The extra exposure from the back being opened created what looks like the Sabattier effect.

The extra exposure from the back being opened created what looks like the Sabattier effect.


An even more extreme example of the effect.

An even more extreme example of the effect.


Cropping out the overexposure and a little tweaking of levels and this could be a nice image.

Cropping out the overexposure and a little tweaking of levels and this could be a nice image.


There are twelve frames with something. A few of those are salvageable as “normal” images. To get the film out, I had to work in the dark bag and cut it loose from the canister. Then I was able to feed it around the take-up spool in the wind direction until it separated from the spool.

    Some notes & random thoughts

  • The film has a really pronounced curl along its length so it was difficult to get it into the scanner. While researching how to get rid of the curl, I came across a suggestion to iron it. I used a black portion of the film to try it. I did about five seconds and the film picked up the texture of the cotton cloth (old summer-weight PJs, not textured) and the table beneath it. I do not recommend ironing curly film. By inserting the film emulsion down, apex of curl up (opposite Canon’s directions), I was able to get the film holder to make it flat enough to scan. It’s easy to flip the images in post. The scans are OK but the film is in a sleeve inside a large hardcover book. I’m curious how long it will take to flatten. I found some wrinkly manuals I’d put in there maybe a year ago (and forgotten) and they look great.
  • I really want to experiment and figure out how the pseudo-solarization came about and repeat it on purpose. On the first yellow image above, I think the left part was on the spool towards the back of the camera and the image was increasingly shielded by the take up spool as you move right. The same for the rotated portrait format image. I’m guessing the landscape one was a lower frame number so it was more shielded. I’ll have to check the numbers. That the effect is yellow is a good starting point for reproducing the effect. Exposed through orange tinted backing, yellow’s RGB complement… I have a lot of research to do.
  • The camera is a little weird and kind of cool for an f/3.5 wide angle P&S from the 1980s. It has an “Easy Viewer”, a low-angle viewfinder like the Photura, and the left side slides off to become an infrared remote. I have a battery and some dead film for transport testing. If it works, I’ll shoot with it and feature it soon.

52 Cameras: # 178 — Ricoh XR-2s




This is the same Kodak High Contrast Copy Film I tested in the Nikon FA. Beautiful but challenging stuff. I shot ~ 1/2 roll and got 13 images. Not 13 subjects since I was bracketing. With the film speed all the way down to ISO 12, the XR-2s doesn’t allow exposure compensation so some I shot at Auto (aperture priority) ISO 12 and some in metered manual at ISO 6. Developed in HC-110 dilution H for 11.5 minutes. Still too much agitation so I had to crop in a bit to avoid the over-development near the sprocket holes.
Pot & rock: f/8 at 1/2 second

Pot & rock: f/8 at 1/2 second


Watering can on stump: f/4 at 1/15

Watering can on stump: f/4 at 1/15


Agave: f/2.8 at 1/8

Agave: f/2.8 at 1/8


A fun bit of history – the receipt for the zoom lens in the kit.
In 1982, the Tokina zoom was HK$700 from Liu's Camera & Radio

In 1982, the Tokina zoom was HK$700 from Liu’s Camera & Radio


This was during the period when the Hong Kong Dollar had a floating value in relation to the US Dollar. According to the Federal Reserve, the exchange on 16 August 1982 was HK$ 6.1350 to 1 US$. The lens was the equivalent of US$114. But, a 1982 US$ is worth US$2.67 today so the lens was the equivalent of US$304. For a constant aperture 100-300mm zoom, that’s a pretty good deal.

Developing C-41 Color Print Film in Black & White Developer

Developing notes
I used Kodak HC-110 developer. I like it and it is what I have right now. I used dilution H, which is 1 part developer to 63 parts water. This is straight developer concentrate, not a stock solution. The concentrate is the US strength, where dilution B is 1+31 — I’ve read that HC-110 comes in a weaker dilution across the pond. I’ve never seen it or used it, just throwing the warning out there.

One thing about using more dilute developer is to make sure you have enough developer concentrate in the solution. The Yankee tank I used calls for 340mL of developer for one roll of 35mm film. Easy enough — divide 340 by 64 to get the amount of syrup I need. It comes out to 5.3125mL. However, you need at least 6mL of HD-110 syrup to have enough of the active chemicals to convert the exposed portions of a roll of 35mm film to metallic silver. So… 6mL X 64 = 384mL total. I use dilution H a lot so I made a mark on a graduated cylinder with a permanent marker at 384mL. That way, I just put in 6mL of syrup and fill to the mark with water. Use dilution H as a one-shot — don’t re-use.

An oral syringe for measuring medicine for children (cats in my case) is perfect for this. I fill a 3mL syringe twice, squirt it into the cylinder, add some water into the cylinder, suck and squirt the water a few times to make sure I get all of the syrup out of the syringe, then top off to 384mL.

I got the most useful information about HC-110 from this page at Covington Innovations.

I used Kodak indicator stop bath at a dilution of 16mL/liter. You might see the recommended dilution stated as 1:64 or 1:63. It’s meant to be one part of a total solution of 64 parts. That’s why I like the 1+## notation rather than a ratio — you don’t have to guess whether the writer means 1 part plus ## water or 1 part of ## solution. It can be re-used and changes color (the indicator) when exhausted but it’s inexpensive so I don’t re-use it.

*The stop bath concentrate is a strong acetic acid. Strong enough to require ground shipping only in the US, so don’t get it on you. It’s also flammable and an inhalation hazard, so seriously, treat it with respect and protect your eyes.*

I used Ilford Rapid Fixer at 1+4. I normally don’t re-use the fixer either. It’s more expensive than the stop but I shoot such a bizarre mix of color print film (usually developed as color print negatives), slides, B&W film, and digital that my problem is usually shelf life rather than chemical exhaustion. If I’m doing a large run, I might re-use. In this case, I didn’t know what the color print film might leave in the solutions, so definitely one-shot.

With everything mixed, we’re finally ready to go.

Everything was done at a temperature of 68F (~20C).

Develop for 11 minutes. The data sheet calls for agitation every 30 seconds. I have a tendency to agitate too vigorously and dilution H is a little more forgiving so I generally do 4 inversions immediately after filling, smack the tank on the counter as I set it down to loosen any bubbles, and repeat at the beginning of each subsequent minute.

Stop for 1 minute. I did 4 inversions + smack at the beginning and then let it sit for the rest of the minute.

Fix for 5 minutes. Ilford recommends 2-5 minutes for B&W films. This was an experiment so getting anything was the goal. I used the same agitation scheme as the developing step.

Wash using the Ilford method: “After fixing, fill the spiral tank with water at the same temperature, +/-5ºC (9ºF), as the processing solutions and invert it five times. Drain the water away and refill. Invert the tank ten times. Once more drain the water away and refill. Finally, invert the tank twenty times and drain the water away.”

I did an extra 20 inversion wash step for good measure.

I filled the tank and added a couple of drops of Kodak Photo-Flo and did 20 inversions.

I took the film out, gave a loud YES! when I saw images, squeegeed with a cellulose sponge and hung to dry.

52 Cameras: # 169 — Petri Color 35E




* Notes on developing C-41 in B&W chemicals.

Interesting that both rolls, shot about a year apart, are partly shot at the Santa Fe National Cemetery. Some moiré pattern on the 1st image here – I must not have had the film secure in the negative holder.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.


She knows me too well.

She knows me too well.


Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.

Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.


Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.

Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.


Seems a bit late but OK.

Seems a bit late but OK.

52 Cameras: # 167 — Canon Photura




Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 labeled “process before 2015-05”. I think I bought it new — it’s been in the freezer.

Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

Plant buddies.  Time to re-pot the spider plant.

Plant buddies. Time to re-pot the spider plant.


Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite.  Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.

Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite. Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.


The neighbor's cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed.  We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.

The neighbor’s cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed. We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.


Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.

Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.


Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.

Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.


Saw blade target.  The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.

Saw blade target. The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.