Tag Archives: 35

Developing C-41 Color Print Film in Black & White Developer

Developing notes
I used Kodak HC-110 developer. I like it and it is what I have right now. I used dilution H, which is 1 part developer to 63 parts water. This is straight developer concentrate, not a stock solution. The concentrate is the US strength, where dilution B is 1+31 — I’ve read that HC-110 comes in a weaker dilution across the pond. I’ve never seen it or used it, just throwing the warning out there.

One thing about using more dilute developer is to make sure you have enough developer concentrate in the solution. The Yankee tank I used calls for 340mL of developer for one roll of 35mm film. Easy enough — divide 340 by 64 to get the amount of syrup I need. It comes out to 5.3125mL. However, you need at least 6mL of HD-110 syrup to have enough of the active chemicals to convert the exposed portions of a roll of 35mm film to metallic silver. So… 6mL X 64 = 384mL total. I use dilution H a lot so I made a mark on a graduated cylinder with a permanent marker at 384mL. That way, I just put in 6mL of syrup and fill to the mark with water. Use dilution H as a one-shot — don’t re-use.

An oral syringe for measuring medicine for children (cats in my case) is perfect for this. I fill a 3mL syringe twice, squirt it into the cylinder, add some water into the cylinder, suck and squirt the water a few times to make sure I get all of the syrup out of the syringe, then top off to 384mL.

I got the most useful information about HC-110 from this page at Covington Innovations.

I used Kodak indicator stop bath at a dilution of 16mL/liter. You might see the recommended dilution stated as 1:64 or 1:63. It’s meant to be one part of a total solution of 64 parts. That’s why I like the 1+## notation rather than a ratio — you don’t have to guess whether the writer means 1 part plus ## water or 1 part of ## solution. It can be re-used and changes color (the indicator) when exhausted but it’s inexpensive so I don’t re-use it.

*The stop bath concentrate is a strong acetic acid. Strong enough to require ground shipping only in the US, so don’t get it on you. It’s also flammable and an inhalation hazard, so seriously, treat it with respect and protect your eyes.*

I used Ilford Rapid Fixer at 1+4. I normally don’t re-use the fixer either. It’s more expensive than the stop but I shoot such a bizarre mix of color print film (usually developed as color print negatives), slides, B&W film, and digital that my problem is usually shelf life rather than chemical exhaustion. If I’m doing a large run, I might re-use. In this case, I didn’t know what the color print film might leave in the solutions, so definitely one-shot.

With everything mixed, we’re finally ready to go.

Everything was done at a temperature of 68F (~20C).

Develop for 11 minutes. The data sheet calls for agitation every 30 seconds. I have a tendency to agitate too vigorously and dilution H is a little more forgiving so I generally do 4 inversions immediately after filling, smack the tank on the counter as I set it down to loosen any bubbles, and repeat at the beginning of each subsequent minute.

Stop for 1 minute. I did 4 inversions + smack at the beginning and then let it sit for the rest of the minute.

Fix for 5 minutes. Ilford recommends 2-5 minutes for B&W films. This was an experiment so getting anything was the goal. I used the same agitation scheme as the developing step.

Wash using the Ilford method: “After fixing, fill the spiral tank with water at the same temperature, +/-5ºC (9ºF), as the processing solutions and invert it five times. Drain the water away and refill. Invert the tank ten times. Once more drain the water away and refill. Finally, invert the tank twenty times and drain the water away.”

I did an extra 20 inversion wash step for good measure.

I filled the tank and added a couple of drops of Kodak Photo-Flo and did 20 inversions.

I took the film out, gave a loud YES! when I saw images, squeegeed with a cellulose sponge and hung to dry.

52 Cameras: # 169 — Petri Color 35E




* Notes on developing C-41 in B&W chemicals.

Interesting that both rolls, shot about a year apart, are partly shot at the Santa Fe National Cemetery. Some moiré pattern on the 1st image here – I must not have had the film secure in the negative holder.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.


She knows me too well.

She knows me too well.


Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.

Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.


Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.

Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.


Seems a bit late but OK.

Seems a bit late but OK.

52 Cameras: # 167 — Canon Photura




Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 labeled “process before 2015-05”. I think I bought it new — it’s been in the freezer.

Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

Plant buddies.  Time to re-pot the spider plant.

Plant buddies. Time to re-pot the spider plant.


Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite.  Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.

Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite. Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.


The neighbor's cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed.  We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.

The neighbor’s cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed. We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.


Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.

Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.


Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.

Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.


Saw blade target.  The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.

Saw blade target. The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.

52 Cameras: # 164 — Nikon N8008s (F-801S)




FPP Retrochrome (Ektachrome). Scanned at 4800, color corrected, and shrunk to 1024 on the long side for the blog.

Rio Grande

Rio Grande


Rio near Embudo

Rio near Embudo


My sweetie at the Rio

My sweetie at the Rio

Hard to balance. Ektachrome is way less sensitive to red and somewhat less to green than blue.
These are screen grabs from GIMP.

The top image above before any edits

The top image above before any edits


Decomposing to the individual channels gives some interesting insight. This creates a gray scale image for each color channel representing the strength of that color’s contribution to the image as a value from 0 (black) to 255 (white). Obviously, the amount of each color mostly depends on the subject matter.
Red:  very dark = low values

Red: very dark = low values


Green is a lot stronger but maybe not as much as you'd expect.  The line of trees behind the shore plants are juniper and piñon.

Green is a lot stronger but maybe not as much as you’d expect. The line of trees behind the shore plants are juniper and piñon.


Blue is as strong or stronger than green, even for the green plants.

Blue is as strong or stronger than green, even for the green plants.


Blue is about what I’d expect a conversion to black and white to look like. It’s that overwhelming in this film.

52 Cameras: # 162 — Nikon FM

    Things I forgot in the video:

  • The FM operates just fine without batteries — just with no metering.
  • The frame counter (36 max) is on the top deck just in front of the wind lever.
  • The LEDs in the viewfinder are used as a battery check.
  • Film speeds are from ISO 12 to 3200. Full stops are numbered (100, 200, …) with dots for 1/3 stop increments (e.g., 64 & 80 between 50 and 100).
  • Lift and turn the shutter speed knob to set the film speed.
  • The back can be removed for an instant or bulk film back.
  • The gallium photodiodes for metering are located in the eyepiece module rather than in the pentaprism. EV1 to EV18.
  • The meter is 60/40 center weighted — 60% given to the center 12mm and the remaining 40% to the rest of the image in the viewfinder.
  • No dedicated mirror lockup but it goes up when the self timer is used.

And… even reading the manual, I got the LED meanings wrong. + or means more than 1 stop off. Center dot and + or means 1/5 to 1 stop off.

From the manual.  Derp.

From the manual. Derp.


Film Photography Project’s “Retrochrome” is expired, cold-stored Kodak Extachrome. Ektachrome is pretty cool, color-wise, even when fresh.



Goober behind the screen.  Removed some blue.

Goober behind the screen. Removed some blue.


Dragon kite.  Removed some blue and bumped the saturation a little.

Dragon kite. Removed some blue and bumped the saturation a little.


Low fall sun through the leaves.  Color corrected and tweaked the levels.

Low fall sun through the leaves. Color corrected and tweaked the levels.


I added another image of Goober (2 versions) because it was a funny struggle to get the colors right. The white sheets were really cool (blue). I tried tons of different tweaks and it was either still too blue or over-corrected and orange. I played with filters while I decided whether to not use the image or just convert it to black and white. Most results were “meh” but I like this solarized one.

Solarized Goober.  Very black light poster.

Solarized Goober. Very black light poster.


Finally, just goofing around, I chose the “skin tone” filter. It’s supposed to correct skin tones that look wrong, usually because of lighting. I clicked the dropper icon on Goober’s face and, like magic, the colors in the image were right.

Goober's magical skin tone.

Goober’s magical skin tone.