Tag Archives: 620

52 Cameras: # 140 — Using the Ansco Readyflash & Spooling 620 Film

Using the Ansco Readyflash Part1: Spooling 620 Film

There are a lot of sites with instructions for paring down 120 spools instead of re-spooling. Give it a whirl if you don’t mind risking a roll. A couple of examples:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-120-Film-in-620-Era-cameras/
https://www.lomography.com/magazine/178618-how-to-modify-120-film-for-a-620-film-camera

One warning if you decide to go this route: The 620 film slot and the corresponding piece in the camera that turns it are smaller. Make sure the adapted roll is smooth on the ends and rotates freely. Otherwise, the bit inside the camera may rotate inside the slot of the film spool and break it. Filing the end of the spool makes it even weaker. See my experience using a 120 spool in a Rover (Diana) camera.



Using the Ansco Readyflash Part2: Loading & Shooting

Film Photography Project 620 film goodies: https://filmphotographystore.com/collections/all/620-film

52 Cameras: # 125 — Kodak Six-20

For lending me the camera — Thanks Dave!

Amazing collection of Kodak catalogs at Kodakcollector.com.

A clarification: The camera could be as late as 1934. The catalog years overlap — 1932-33, 1933-34, 1934-35. The 34-35 catalog is the first one to show the “Action Front” push button bed release. The 32-33 catalog is the only one that explicitly states the camera is available in black or brown but I don’t know if later model years had the color choice. If it is from 33-34, the doublet was the low-end lens with an f/6.3 or f/4.5 anastigmat as an upgrade and a Diodak shutter option which added 1/10 second to the speeds of the Kodon.



View of the Truchas Mountains.

View of the Truchas Mountains.

The scalloping at the top of the next image is from re-spooling the film. I didn’t have it perfectly parallel to the 620 spool rim so the film & paper came off at an angle and wrinkled.

No idea -- it looks like water.

No idea — it looks like water.

Taken with the tape and poster board seals. Still leaked.

Trinity in the sun.  Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity in the sun. Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity on the sun porch.  No leaks!

Trinity on the sun porch. No leaks!




That’s it for posted images taken with this camera. About the kludges follows.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Sketching out the "over bellows".

Sketching out the “over bellows”.

Getting the cardboard between the bellows and the folding front was a challenge. Good view of the aperture setting: U.S. 8=f/11, 16=f/16, 32=f/22, 64=f/32.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

I thought I was done here.

I thought I was done here.

The back is 6 X 9cm and the front is sized to let the Instax frame slide in.

Instax Mini adapter.

Instax Mini adapter.

I still got light leaks between the top and body. I tried yet more tape before giving up and shrouding the whole thing with my dark bag.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

I don’t have a proper darkroom so here’s the process. I taped up the Instax film box to use as a transfer station.

  1. Put the film in the box.
  2. The box and camera go into the dark bag. Remove the film, remove one frame from the cartridge, insert it in the holder in the camera, and put the cartridge back in the box.
  3. Meter, carefully take the camera out of the bag, and shroud everything but the lens and shutter trigger.
  4. Take the shot and put the camera back in the bag.
  5. Take the frame out of the holder, slide it back in the Instax cartridge, and put the cartridge in the light-tight box.
  6. Put the Instax camera in the bag, load the cartridge, take it out, cover the lens, and shoot it to run the print through the Instax rollers.

I got turned around a couple of times and loaded the Instax frame with the image side towards the lens. I burned through most of a box of 10 prints to get two OK images but it was still a lot cheaper and faster than using negative film (re-spool, reload, process) for each iteration.

Attempted Repair of the Argoflex Seventy-Five

Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. Here’s the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

It’s pretty easy to get inside to the shutter. The first tear-down was more thorough — I removed the insert that goes from the back of the shutter to the film plane and disassembled the viewfinder. There are two screws inside the light-tight chamber.

Four screws on the front.

Four screws on the front.


This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector.  It will immediately fall out.

This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector. It will immediately fall out.


Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.

Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.


I completely removed the VF during the cleaning tear-down to get to the lens and mirror. The VF hood is a pain to get back in its slot so don’t do it unless you have to.
With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.

With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.


The four front screws also hold the lens board -- it pops right out.

The four front screws also hold the lens board — it pops right out.


Without the shutter cocked, you can't really see the part the selector works.

Without the shutter cocked, you can’t really see the part the selector works.


This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.

This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.


The triangular piece coming in at the left selects "instantaneous" or "time".

The triangular piece coming in at the left selects “instantaneous” or “time”.


Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.

Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.


One screw at the bottom.

One screw at the bottom.


Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.

Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.


The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.

The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.


Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn't move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).

Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn’t move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).


It's a two-piece shutter.  The red opens followed by the rear that closes.  The triangle holds the rear open.

It’s a two-piece shutter. The red opens followed by the rear that closes. The triangle holds the rear open.


I thought this wasn't pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.

I thought this wasn’t pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.


Bad alignment but I bent it down.  It also increased the friction.

Bad alignment but I bent it down. It also increased the friction.


Holding the triangle down with a small drill bit, the shutter worked at the instantaneous setting every time. Bending the selector seemed to work but it isn’t reliable. I’ll go inside again and report back here.

52 Cameras: # 122 — Argus Argoflex Seventy-Five




It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I've seen.  L-R reversed.

It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I’ve seen. L-R reversed.


I included this to show the film edge markings.

I included this to show the film edge markings.


Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.

Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.


Super-blurry but I like this one too.

Super-blurry but I like this one too.


I’m still trying to find my Photoshop Elements disk. It’s in a box somewhere. In the meantime, I’ve been using GIMP. The workflow is really different but it’s growing on me.
I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.

I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.




I have a few shots from disassembling the camera to clean it. I’ll combine those with photos of the 2nd tear-down to fix the shutter and post here. Hopefully followed by another roll of images.


Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. A couple of images and the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

52 Cameras: # 109 — Ansco Readyflash 620




It’s really pushing the limits of the lens to get 6X9cm images. Some vignetting and distortion but a nice effect overall.
Fruit trees in the yard.

Fruit trees in the yard.

THEY LIVE

I like this image in spite of the scratch and texture from the backing paper.

I like this image in spite of the scratch and texture from the backing paper.

The lens takes the image right to the edge — you can see the edge marking “SGPFF” at the bottom.

The dog pen that now hosts our compost pile.

The dog pen that now hosts our compost pile.

52 Cameras: # 95 — Rover (Diana) 620

I forgot to include a couple of things in the video. The Rover has 3 focus settings, 4-6 feet, 6-12 feet, and 12 feet to infinity. It also has a bulb setting. Bulb is a bit of a challenge since it has no cable release and no tripod socket.



I only got six shots on the first roll before the film jammed. A couple of examples are in the video.

Expired Kodak Ektar 100 film. Processed by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe and scanned on a CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI.

The view from our room at The Line in LA.  We paid for a view of the Hollywood Hills and it was foggy the whole time.

The view from our room at The Line in LA. We paid for a view of the Hollywood Hills and it was foggy the whole time.

Kodak Tri-X 400 developed in HC-110 and Ilford rapid fix. Scanned on a CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI.

"Urban Light" by Chris Burden at LACMA.

“Urban Light” by Chris Burden at LACMA.

My sweetie at Ray's & Stark Bar at LACMA.

My sweetie at Ray’s & Stark Bar at LACMA.

Palm tree and marble.

Palm tree and marble.

There's always construction in LA.

There’s always construction in LA.

Waterfall at the La Brea Tar Pits museum.

Waterfall at the La Brea Tar Pits museum.

52 Cameras: Week 38 part 2 — Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash

This camera found a new home at my Etsy shop:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/EcoBodega

The Lomo film (expired in 2012) is better than I expected and the old lens is sharper than I expected. Processing and contact print by Visions Photo Lab. Scanned as black and white at 4800DPI on the CanoScan 9000f using the Canon Scan Gear software. Some of the images are cropped — I like to scan a little larger than the image in case I have to straighten. A little bit of dust and cat hair cleanup in Photoshop but no other edits.

We stopped at a couple of abandoned motels in Española.

We stopped at a couple of abandoned motels in Española.

Turns out someone was living here.

Turns out someone was living here.

The flowers should have given me a clue.

The flowers should have given me a clue.

The Arrow Motel is definitely empty.

The Arrow Motel is definitely empty.

52 Cameras: Week 38 part 1 — Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash

This camera found a new home at my Etsy shop:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/EcoBodega

This camera is in surprisingly good shape. All it needed was a good cleaning and a little glue on the case where the felt was coming away from the leather.

I usually have a couple of cameras (or several) going at once since the first test frequently goes jelly-side down. I had four going at once and they all came out so I have some time to do repairs and scanning.