Tag Archives: Ansco

52 Cameras: # 140 — Using the Ansco Readyflash & Spooling 620 Film

Using the Ansco Readyflash Part1: Spooling 620 Film

There are a lot of sites with instructions for paring down 120 spools instead of re-spooling. Give it a whirl if you don’t mind risking a roll. A couple of examples:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-120-Film-in-620-Era-cameras/
https://www.lomography.com/magazine/178618-how-to-modify-120-film-for-a-620-film-camera

One warning if you decide to go this route: The 620 film slot and the corresponding piece in the camera that turns it are smaller. Make sure the adapted roll is smooth on the ends and rotates freely. Otherwise, the bit inside the camera may rotate inside the slot of the film spool and break it. Filing the end of the spool makes it even weaker. See my experience using a 120 spool in a Rover (Diana) camera.



Using the Ansco Readyflash Part2: Loading & Shooting

Film Photography Project 620 film goodies: https://filmphotographystore.com/collections/all/620-film

52 Cameras: # 118 — Ansco Craftsman (1950)

Thanks Sonette!


Ansco also made a box camera ca. 1926 called the Craftsman No.2A.



Not a lot of images to show in addition to what’s in the video. Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros developed in Kodak HC-110.

Because the shutter is slow I used a Y2 filter (1 stop) for most of the shots on this roll. The yellow provides a nice contrast boost too.

I’m really impressed by the sharpness of the images. No post-processing other than resizing.

Zoe checking out the new-old rug for my office.

Zoe checking out the new-old rug for my office.

Lousy composition but I love the contrasts in aspen bark.

Lousy composition but I love the contrasts in aspen bark.

The neighbor's goats.

The neighbor’s goats.




I struck out trying to find a manual or information and had to find out for myself.

Checking the focal length
I taped the inside edge, where the film insert goes and marked the tape at the film plane.

Marking the film plane

Marking the film plane

Next I taped the lens inside so I wouldn’t scratch it with the calipers and put a thin piece of card stock along the film plane line.

Card stock to measure against the calipers

Card stock to measure against the calipers

The calipers have a post that sticks out as the jaws open allowing depth measurements.

90mm-ish

90mm-ish

Checking the aperture
You can see the aperture in front of the lens but behind the shutter.

Aperture

Aperture

The Play-Doh was covered in plastic food wrap as I held the shutter open with the stem from a cotton swab and pressed it into the aperture. I could have used about five hands for this operation. Thankfully, there isn’t glass in front of the shutter.

7mm-ish

7mm-ish

~90mm focal length / ~7mm diameter = ~f/13.

And then I found this ad. I need to re-find it on the web so I can give proper credit.

f/14

f/14

Checking the shutter speed
I set the Olympus to 240 frames per second and shot the shutter six times. In Quicktime, I counted frames from closed (pure black) to closed again. From my working notes:

Vid at 240 frames / second = 4.17 ms / frame

1. 14
2. 12
3. 12
4. 14
5. 12
6. 11
——
75 / 6 = 12.5 frames

12.5 x 4.17ms = 0.0521 seconds = ~ 5/100 = ~ 1/20 second avg.

fastest = 11 = ~ 4.6/100 = ~ 1/22
slowest = 14 = ~ 5.8/100 = ~ 1/17

Frame counter window

Frame counter window

The red window is bright and easy to read. Maybe too easy. The right edge of the aspen image and the top of the goats have some funky marks. It could be from processing. I’d need to shoot another roll doing frames with the window covered and uncovered to be sure.

Note to self: Cover the window on an old unknown camera unless that’s part of the test.

52 Cameras: # 109 — Ansco Readyflash 620




It’s really pushing the limits of the lens to get 6X9cm images. Some vignetting and distortion but a nice effect overall.
Fruit trees in the yard.

Fruit trees in the yard.

THEY LIVE

I like this image in spite of the scratch and texture from the backing paper.

I like this image in spite of the scratch and texture from the backing paper.

The lens takes the image right to the edge — you can see the edge marking “SGPFF” at the bottom.

The dog pen that now hosts our compost pile.

The dog pen that now hosts our compost pile.

52 Cameras: # 101 — Ansco Cadet Disc100

Even at 4800DPI, these are small negatives to work with. The vintage of the film — Kodak was the last holdout and gave up in 1999 — doesn’t help. This disc (using the preferred spelling for the film format) is Fuji. No idea when it expired.

On the Sandstone Bluffs at El Malpais National Monument.

On the Sandstone Bluffs at El Malpais National Monument.

My sweetie.

My sweetie.

Not checking texts, she was taking photos of the evaporating pools.

Not checking texts, she was taking photos of the evaporating pools.

On the way to the arch.

On the way to the arch.