Tag Archives: camera

52 Cameras: # 134 — Polaroid Sun 600 LMS




Scanned on a CanoScan 9000f at 600DPI. These are resized to 1024 pixels on the short side.
The first two are also in the video. There are 8 frames in a pack of Impossible film — it’s not like I have 36 images to choose from, plus, I really like them.
Zoe.  No idea why it happened but I love the colors on the white walls.

Zoe. No idea why it happened but I love the colors on the white walls.


Most RVs run the gamut from butt-ugly to "meh".  Airstreams are cool.

Most RVs run the gamut from butt-ugly to “meh”. Airstreams are cool.


This is a lame picture but it’s the result of an experiment so I included it. I used a telephoto adapter for a Canon AF35ML/Super Sure Shot/Autoboy Super (which sadly, I don’t have working yet). I framed using the adapter lens held over the viewfinder lens and then moved it over the taking lens. I was a little sloppy with the framing (no tripod) and got my finger in the picture but it works! That means I can use an even longer telephoto, a wide angle, or even a fish-eye adapter. I do need to adjust for the loss of light next time — there ain’t no free lunch.
There's a hummingbird in there somewhere.

There’s a hummingbird in there somewhere.


Another developer-didn’t-quite-reach splat. Still, not bad for film that’s been expired for 2 years.
My sweeties, chillin' on the couch.

My sweeties, chillin’ on the couch.


Just after sunset using flash override.  Highlighting the foliage in the foreground would've looked weird.

Just after sunset using flash override. Highlighting the foliage in the foreground would’ve looked weird.


My other swwetie, Trinity.  She has a 6th sense like Zoe, and starts moving when a shutter fires.

My other swwetie, Trinity. She has a 6th sense like Zoe, and starts moving when a shutter fires.


Last frame in the pack -- walking into the sun on our street.

Last frame in the pack — walking into the sun on our street.




Update 9 July 2017: One camera is for sale. $45.00 shipping included. I’m keeping the other one for film experiments.
Includes camera, original strap, and case.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/527824466/1983-polaroid-sun-600-lms-shipping
A sexy little beast.

A sexy little beast.


Frog tongue.

Frog tongue.


Nice clean film chamber and rollers.

Nice clean film chamber and rollers.


Original case.

Original case.


Detail of the strange override button.

Detail of the strange override button.

52 Cameras: # 133 — Sears FF35 Motor Drive




Some color correction from the old film — this camera got the other half of the 1997 Fuji 400 roll.
I hope I can fix/remove the weird drips. I like a couple of the images enough to try with swabs and distilled water.
Wisteria in Santa Fe

Wisteria in Santa Fe


Cool stump in the yard.

Cool stump in the yard.


Pizza piñata -- what's not to love?

Pizza piñata — what’s not to love?


My sweetie lurking at the top of the stairs.

My sweetie lurking at the top of the stairs.

This guy decided to shoot with cameras he could get for 99P (under a pound UK) and the Halina Speedy 33 was his first project camera: https://austerityphoto.co.uk/halina-speedy-33-poundland-camera-no-1/

The Owner’s Manual is posted on the Manuals page.

52 Cameras: # 132 — Olympus Infinity Zoom 2000




I did a LOT of color correction on these. The film in the camera in the video is not what I used — that’s a bad roll of Polaroid I use to test film transport, etc. The images are Fuji ISO 400, expired in April of 1997 and it shows. Really grainy and it has a bluish tint almost like expired slide film. I processed this at home (Unicolor C-41 kit) so temperature variation might be part of it. It’s not the camera’s fault.

Cropped pretty far into this so it's extra grainy.  A truck pulled up right when I pressed the shutter.

Cropped pretty far into this so it’s extra grainy. A truck pulled up right when I pressed the shutter.


Another random cat.

Another random cat.


The Koni-Omega.  A project camera taking a picture of a project camera...

The Koni-Omega. A project camera taking a picture of a project camera…


A cool cat scarf M picked up at a pop-up store in Santa Fe.

A cool cat scarf M picked up at a pop-up store in Santa Fe.


Jem is so chill.

Jem is so chill.


Dried up roses.  I got a lot of mileage out of these flowers as a subject.

Dried up roses. I got a lot of mileage out of these flowers as a subject.

52 Cameras: # 129 — Pinhole cameras WPPD 2017


Links mentioned in the video:

Drill Your Own Precision Pinhole Apertures


http://www.mrpinhole.com
http://pinholeday.org



I like to show different images here but I was processing as we went to check exposure so we only got 3 from the paint can camera.

A chart from Mr. Pinhole showed 2.5 minutes. My meter app showed 1.5. We split the difference at 2 minutes and ended up overexposed. It was bright out.

I tweaked the levels a little bit.

I tweaked the levels a little bit.


I backed off the exposure time for this one.

I backed off the exposure time for this one.


You can’t see the close-focus distortion from the curved plane in the video.

The scanner at work, a Canon print/scan/fax thing, was giving me bad reflections from the clear plastic on the Instax frames so i had to adjust. They’re underexposed to start with — f/256 is pretty dim.

Tusker and Melon -- my WPPD contribution.

Tusker and Melon — my WPPD contribution.


Side-lit Buddha.

Side-lit Buddha.


Some of M's pots.

Some of M’s pots.




My kludge of a darkroom…
Foam core poster board painted black on the window.

Foam core poster board painted black on the window.


Black craft paper and tape around the door.  Towel at the bottom.

Black craft paper and tape around the door. Towel at the bottom.


It worked, it was black-black. Then I remembered when I bought a guy’s old darkroom stuff, I got a…
Safe light!  This is paper, not film.

Safe light! This is paper, not film.


Develop...

Develop…


Stop...

Stop…


Fix (It's a small bathroom)...

Fix (It’s a small bathroom)…


After a good rinse, hang to dry.

After a good rinse, hang to dry.

52 Cameras: # 127 — Konica CF35 EF3




Heavy noise reduction on all. I hope some of it is scanner noise rather than grain so I can re-scan at higher resolution on a couple of them.
Atalaya Mountain -- i love the way the light hits the needles.

Atalaya Mountain — i love the way the light hits the needles.


There was a weird dust splat and I did a little color correction on this one.
Looking west across the Rio Grande valley.

Looking west across the Rio Grande valley.


Color correction for the old film.
Blossoms in La Mesilla.

Blossoms in La Mesilla.


Boosted the mid-tones. The noise reduction tends to make things look flat and this could’ve used flash.
Zoe going for the "people water".

Zoe going for the “people water”.

52 Cameras: # 125 — Kodak Six-20

For lending me the camera — Thanks Dave!

Amazing collection of Kodak catalogs at Kodakcollector.com.

A clarification: The camera could be as late as 1934. The catalog years overlap — 1932-33, 1933-34, 1934-35. The 34-35 catalog is the first one to show the “Action Front” push button bed release. The 32-33 catalog is the only one that explicitly states the camera is available in black or brown but I don’t know if later model years had the color choice. If it is from 33-34, the doublet was the low-end lens with an f/6.3 or f/4.5 anastigmat as an upgrade and a Diodak shutter option which added 1/10 second to the speeds of the Kodon.



View of the Truchas Mountains.

View of the Truchas Mountains.

The scalloping at the top of the next image is from re-spooling the film. I didn’t have it perfectly parallel to the 620 spool rim so the film & paper came off at an angle and wrinkled.

No idea -- it looks like water.

No idea — it looks like water.

Taken with the tape and poster board seals. Still leaked.

Trinity in the sun.  Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity in the sun. Instax with the tape/cardboard seals.

Trinity on the sun porch.  No leaks!

Trinity on the sun porch. No leaks!




That’s it for posted images taken with this camera. About the kludges follows.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Dark room and an LED flashlight inside show just how leaky the bellows is.

Sketching out the "over bellows".

Sketching out the “over bellows”.

Getting the cardboard between the bellows and the folding front was a challenge. Good view of the aperture setting: U.S. 8=f/11, 16=f/16, 32=f/22, 64=f/32.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

Nothing like a closeup to show how dusty it is.

I thought I was done here.

I thought I was done here.

The back is 6 X 9cm and the front is sized to let the Instax frame slide in.

Instax Mini adapter.

Instax Mini adapter.

I still got light leaks between the top and body. I tried yet more tape before giving up and shrouding the whole thing with my dark bag.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

Getting kind of silly with the tape.

I don’t have a proper darkroom so here’s the process. I taped up the Instax film box to use as a transfer station.

  1. Put the film in the box.
  2. The box and camera go into the dark bag. Remove the film, remove one frame from the cartridge, insert it in the holder in the camera, and put the cartridge back in the box.
  3. Meter, carefully take the camera out of the bag, and shroud everything but the lens and shutter trigger.
  4. Take the shot and put the camera back in the bag.
  5. Take the frame out of the holder, slide it back in the Instax cartridge, and put the cartridge in the light-tight box.
  6. Put the Instax camera in the bag, load the cartridge, take it out, cover the lens, and shoot it to run the print through the Instax rollers.

I got turned around a couple of times and loaded the Instax frame with the image side towards the lens. I burned through most of a box of 10 prints to get two OK images but it was still a lot cheaper and faster than using negative film (re-spool, reload, process) for each iteration.