Tag Archives: film

52 Cameras: # 153 — Vivitar A35 Splash Proof




Photoworks ISO 400 film. Expired in 2006. Scanned on a Canon 9000f at 2400DPI and reduced to 1024 on the long side for upload.

The sensor apparently adjusts the flash. The film is 400 but it’s lost speed with age so probably more like 200. Indoor shots are underexposed so the scanner pumps up the gain so I get film grain plus scanner noise. Still, not bad for a cheap camera and cheap, old film.

The munchkin took this one.

The munchkin took this one.


Stairwell coming out of the city parking garage.

Stairwell coming out of the city parking garage.


My timing was off and I split the car with the pole.

My timing was off and I split the car with the pole.




Some research info…
The auction ad showing the manual copyright date and the box showing that the camera was sold by itself.

The auction ad showing the manual copyright date and the box showing that the camera was sold by itself.


This next ad might be able to claim accuracy on technicalities. The shutter could be accurate at all of its one speeds. It auto-focuses at the one, fixed, focus setting. Maybe there were variations and some cameras came with an f/4.5 lens.
This same info was in several ads by different sellers.

This same info was in several ads by different sellers.


ISO info from a picture of a manual page in another ad.

ISO info from a picture of a manual page in another ad.


Kudos to QVC for advertising with accurate information.

Kudos to QVC for advertising with accurate information.

52 Cameras: # 152 — Cardboard Box Pinhole




The fugly beast itself.
325mm, F/428, 8X10" paper negative.  Custom  variable duration shutter (it's tape).

325mm, F/428, 8X10″ paper negative. Custom variable duration shutter (it’s tape).


Not a lot to show — I only took the two images.
Tree negative

Tree negative


This old cottonwood is 95% dead but the birds love it.

This old cottonwood is 95% dead but the birds love it.


The wind was trying to steal the box so the paper tore and the flaps got in the way.

The wind was trying to steal the box so the paper tore and the flaps got in the way.


Black Mesa and La Capilla de la Familia Sagrada

Black Mesa and La Capilla de la Familia Sagrada

52 Cameras: # 151 — Petri 7




Scanned at 2400DPI on a Canon Canoscan 9000f.
Frame numbers are as they came off the scanner and not the film frame numbers.
Another from the tail-end of the Canon T50.  Is it a double-exposure if the images are from different cameras?

Another from the tail-end of the Canon T50. Is it a double-exposure if the images are from different cameras?


Poor Jem - I caught him mid-sneeze.

Poor Jem – I caught him mid-sneeze.


One of those "oops" that's kind of cool.

One of those “oops” that’s kind of cool.

Phound Photos Volume 8

This was the found roll I developed with the film I shot in the Canon T50. The film base also came out green on this roll. The colors came out well on the scanner except for the red light leak-looking areas. Thinking about it, I used a Paterson tank I hadn’t used before. Maybe I had a leak in addition to the problem with development.

The film is Costco Fujicolor Superia X-Tra 400. Found in a Minolta Explorer. I need to get the model off of it and I’ll edit this.

Is this thing on?  AH!  I'm blind!  I adjusted the levels -- it was really blown out from the flash.

Is this thing on? AH! I’m blind! I adjusted the levels — it was really blown out from the flash.

Mom and dad?

Mom and dad?

Burnt weenies and a can of beans.

Burnt weenies and a can of beans.

Camping is fun.  :-|

Camping is fun. :-|

Cool dog.

Cool dog.

The whole roll came out. Anyone who knows these people or who are these people can contact me via the YouTube comments for the Minolta Freedom Zoom Explorer EX and get their images.

52 Cameras: # 149 — Meopta Milona




Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.

Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.


This was more of a "catch it falling off the post because I don't have a tripod" kind of deal.

This was more of a “catch it falling off the post because I don’t have a tripod” kind of deal.


And this was a "Did I wind?  I'm pretty sure I wound."  I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.

And this was a “Did I wind? I’m pretty sure I wound.” I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.


Did I really use film that wasn't expired?  I could be on to something!

Did I really use film that wasn’t expired? I could be on to something!


I was cleaning the office/workshop while the pigeons ferried buckets of bits to Youtube. Not able to find anything clean, but less dangerous. I discovered I had one unused frame in an Instax Mini. I loaded it by feel into the Milona inside the dark bag, shot it, and then put it back into the Instax for processing. I didn’t get it lined up quite right but not bad.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

52 Cameras: Camera 56 Revisited – Canon EOS 750

Original EOS 750 post at http://exit272.com/?p=1626

With a couple of exceptions, a camera with almost no control isn’t usually one I’d shoot with again. A fellow Youtuber asked if the 750 might gain aperture control using a speed booster. A Speed Booster™ (trademark of Metabones) isn’t available for a full frame camera and not for EOS to EOS. It would mess up the flange focal distance, losing infinity focus. That plus the anti-teleconverter aspect of the Speed Booster™ is more math than I want to tackle to figure out what it would do to the image.

I don’t have a speed booster but I do have lens adapters and old lenses. What will the 750 body do if it doesn’t find an EOS lens? Most modern DSLRs have a setting that allows the shutter to work without a lens being detected for macro tubes, bellows, etc., that break the lens-body communication link. This is a much older camera with no menus but it’s worth a shot.

First up, an M42 screw mount adapter. Nothing is passed through to the camera, it just puts the lens at the right distance from the film (or sensor) plane. A fresh battery, pop on the adapter, turn it on and…

No errors. Promising. In goes a dead roll of film (great for testing transport without wasting film) and the film pre-winds like it’s supposed to. The camera body lets me “take pictures”. The 750 is from 1988 and the EOS system had only been out about a year and a half so I guess it’s not that surprising that the firmware doesn’t have a routine for failing without a lens. ROM space used to be expensive.

I have some craptastic Photoworks film (a 24 exposure roll of “Use by 11/2004” ISO 200) so I’m good to go — just gambling some developer.

I used a Helios 44-2, a beautiful Soviet-era lens. It can be tedious but one of its quirks is what I want for this experiment. It doesn’t stop down automatically. You set the aperture and a separate ring swings between wide open (f/2 in this case) and your setting. This lets you focus on a nice bright image and then rotate the ring to stop down without having to look at the lens.

The 750 does full aperture metering. There is a separate, 6 zone light meter that reads the light with the lens wide open to get the exposure value (EV) so the camera can calculate the shutter/aperture combination.

It could be implemented as a lookup table in the camera.  The bottom line is the red one.

It could be implemented as a lookup table in the camera. The bottom line is the red one.

How it works with an EOS lens. Anthropomorphizing and probably not completely accurate:

EOS body: Hey lens, what are you?
Lens: I’m a 50mm and I go from f/1.4 to f/22.
EB: Open up to 1.4 so the nice human can see what they’re doing.
L: Done.
[ Human 1/2 presses the shutter ]
EB: We’ve got focus lock. EV is just about zero. At 1/125 second I’m reading 2 stops over.
[ Human presses the shutter button the rest of the way ]
EB: Stop down to f/2.8.
[ f/2.8 is 2 stops dimmer (smaller) than f/1.4 ]
L: Done.
EB: Mirror up. Shutter fired. Mirror down. Advancing film. Open up to 1.4 so the nice human can see what they’re doing.
[ The 750 actually sucks the film back into the can rather than advancing but you get the idea ]

If the camera defaults to aperture priority, I’m golden. It’ll meter the scene and pick a shutter speed. If it does some shutter and aperture auto-exposure (AE) voodoo or shutter priority (Tv in Canon-speak), the experiment is toast. AE is bad because it can’t control the manual lens to match an aperture to its chosen shutter speed. Tv is bad because there is no feedback to tell me what shutter is chosen so I can pick an aperture.

Either I got lucky with a lot of exposure combinations or it does aperture priority. This also makes sense. When EOS was introduced, people who’d spent a fortune on the mechanical FD lenses screamed bloody murder. Canon even made FD to EOS converters with corrective lenses in them. With no way to communicate between the lens and the body, the only solution is to do aperture priority or manual (if the body lets you select the shutter speed).

Here’s my process. Turn the lens ring to wide open so the scene is bright and focus. Turn the ring to the f/stop I want and 1/2 press to turn on the meter.

Slow blinking 'P' = open up, use a tripod, or flash.  Fast = figure out over or under & adjust.

Slow blinking ‘P’ = open up, use a tripod, or flash. Fast = figure out over or under & adjust.

Helios 44-2 at f/16.  Metering at f/2, the 'P' in the viewfinder blinks indicating exposure out of range.

Helios 44-2 at f/16. Metering at f/2, the ‘P’ in the viewfinder blinks indicating exposure out of range.

Some macro shots. I’ve had the broken balsa plane and cicada wing forever. Add feathers and a seed and I have a theme. To get some depth of field, I had to stop way down. F/16 was too dark. Not bad exposure dark, just not an attractive image.

F/16 with flash was too bright.

F/16 with flash was too bright.


F/16 with some LED lights was just right.

F/16 with some LED lights was just right.


F/16.  I used flash but I was so close it was partially blocked by the lens.

F/16. I used flash but I was so close it was partially blocked by the lens.

Next I tried a Nikon adapter. It has a “Dandelion” chip for focus confirmation but the 750 ignored it completely. It works with a Canon 60D DSLR so it’s probably the age of the 750’s firmware.

Nikon 50mm at f/1.4.

Nikon 50mm at f/1.4.


Same scene at f/16 with flash.

Same scene at f/16 with flash.

I’m not sure what’s up with the flower images (ignore the dust and cat hair — that’s a different issue entirely). It might be the film — the Photoworks stuff has lost a lot of speed from age and tends to make really crummy, thin negatives. It’s also possible my notes are wrong. According to my notes, the first one is at f/2.8 but it’s so thin the scanner had to boost the gain and made it ugly and grainy just to get something.

Nikon at f/2.8.

Nikon at f/2.8.


My notes say f/11 and this looks OK.

My notes say f/11 and this looks OK.


F/16 with flash.  Exposure is all right but the colors are way off.  The wall isn't blue.

F/16 with flash. Exposure is all right but the colors are way off. The wall isn’t blue.

While writing this, it dawned on me that the bad images are under artificial light. Everything else is outside or on the sun porch. It fits the symptoms if the old film lost sensitivity to specific wavelengths.

The short answer (too late) is: The EOS 750 works well as an aperture priority camera with manual lenses.

Thanks to Salvador for asking a good question leading me to this fascinating journey.