Tag Archives: film

52 Cameras: # 172 — Spartus Full-Vue




Made In Chicago Museum’s article on Spartus, Jack Galter, & the “Chicago Cluster”.

Boys’ Life from Google Books.

Boys' Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section

Boys’ Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section


You talkin' to me?

You talkin’ to me?


You talik' to ME?!

You talik’ to ME?!


Nope, just munching.

Nope, just munching.


Photographer's shadow

Photographer’s shadow


At first i thought I took this one but it has a frame number from before the bend in the film.
Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree - we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.

Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree – we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.


The whole Instax Mini frame

The whole Instax Mini frame

Developing C-41 Color Print Film in Black & White Developer

Developing notes
I used Kodak HC-110 developer. I like it and it is what I have right now. I used dilution H, which is 1 part developer to 63 parts water. This is straight developer concentrate, not a stock solution. The concentrate is the US strength, where dilution B is 1+31 — I’ve read that HC-110 comes in a weaker dilution across the pond. I’ve never seen it or used it, just throwing the warning out there.

One thing about using more dilute developer is to make sure you have enough developer concentrate in the solution. The Yankee tank I used calls for 340mL of developer for one roll of 35mm film. Easy enough — divide 340 by 64 to get the amount of syrup I need. It comes out to 5.3125mL. However, you need at least 6mL of HD-110 syrup to have enough of the active chemicals to convert the exposed portions of a roll of 35mm film to metallic silver. So… 6mL X 64 = 384mL total. I use dilution H a lot so I made a mark on a graduated cylinder with a permanent marker at 384mL. That way, I just put in 6mL of syrup and fill to the mark with water. Use dilution H as a one-shot — don’t re-use.

An oral syringe for measuring medicine for children (cats in my case) is perfect for this. I fill a 3mL syringe twice, squirt it into the cylinder, add some water into the cylinder, suck and squirt the water a few times to make sure I get all of the syrup out of the syringe, then top off to 384mL.

I got the most useful information about HC-110 from this page at Covington Innovations.

I used Kodak indicator stop bath at a dilution of 16mL/liter. You might see the recommended dilution stated as 1:64 or 1:63. It’s meant to be one part of a total solution of 64 parts. That’s why I like the 1+## notation rather than a ratio — you don’t have to guess whether the writer means 1 part plus ## water or 1 part of ## solution. It can be re-used and changes color (the indicator) when exhausted but it’s inexpensive so I don’t re-use it.

*The stop bath concentrate is a strong acetic acid. Strong enough to require ground shipping only in the US, so don’t get it on you. It’s also flammable and an inhalation hazard, so seriously, treat it with respect and protect your eyes.*

I used Ilford Rapid Fixer at 1+4. I normally don’t re-use the fixer either. It’s more expensive than the stop but I shoot such a bizarre mix of color print film (usually developed as color print negatives), slides, B&W film, and digital that my problem is usually shelf life rather than chemical exhaustion. If I’m doing a large run, I might re-use. In this case, I didn’t know what the color print film might leave in the solutions, so definitely one-shot.

With everything mixed, we’re finally ready to go.

Everything was done at a temperature of 68F (~20C).

Develop for 11 minutes. The data sheet calls for agitation every 30 seconds. I have a tendency to agitate too vigorously and dilution H is a little more forgiving so I generally do 4 inversions immediately after filling, smack the tank on the counter as I set it down to loosen any bubbles, and repeat at the beginning of each subsequent minute.

Stop for 1 minute. I did 4 inversions + smack at the beginning and then let it sit for the rest of the minute.

Fix for 5 minutes. Ilford recommends 2-5 minutes for B&W films. This was an experiment so getting anything was the goal. I used the same agitation scheme as the developing step.

Wash using the Ilford method: “After fixing, fill the spiral tank with water at the same temperature, +/-5ºC (9ºF), as the processing solutions and invert it five times. Drain the water away and refill. Invert the tank ten times. Once more drain the water away and refill. Finally, invert the tank twenty times and drain the water away.”

I did an extra 20 inversion wash step for good measure.

I filled the tank and added a couple of drops of Kodak Photo-Flo and did 20 inversions.

I took the film out, gave a loud YES! when I saw images, squeegeed with a cellulose sponge and hung to dry.

52 Cameras: # 169 — Petri Color 35E




* Notes on developing C-41 in B&W chemicals.

Interesting that both rolls, shot about a year apart, are partly shot at the Santa Fe National Cemetery. Some moiré pattern on the 1st image here – I must not have had the film secure in the negative holder.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.


She knows me too well.

She knows me too well.


Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.

Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.


Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.

Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.


Seems a bit late but OK.

Seems a bit late but OK.

52 Cameras: # 168 — Franka Solida I




Kodak Tri-X 400, develop by 12/2016. I bought it new and it’s been frozen. Developed in HC-110 H (1+63) for 9 minutes at 68F. Scanned on the CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI. I used both Canon’s software and Vuescan and picked whichever version I liked better. The bird bath in the video is a merged image from both.
It's only fair -- I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura

It’s only fair — I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura


I think the vignetting is not entirely the camera’s fault. I was pretty close with 400 film and the Vivitar flash I used didn’t actually have the combination of speed and distance on its chart so I kind of winged it and used f/32.
The wedding bouquet after a few weeks

The wedding bouquet after a few weeks


The junk at the top is from over-agitating during development.
Playing with the double exposure

Playing with the double exposure


Zoomed in to clean up dust specks, I noticed Jem’s face in the branches (screen grab PNG).
Detail -- Jem The Cheshire Cat

Detail — Jem The Cheshire Cat

Phound Photos Volume 12

I was so stoked when I saw the old 3000 speed film inside the Polaroid 100 with the Zeiss viewfinder, I didn’t thoroughly go through the kit. Inside the cold clip was this old sepia Polaroid print.

Looks like an airport terminal.

Looks like an airport terminal.

On the back is what looks like the letter ‘H’ and the number 815341. It seems to be part of the print and not a catalog number or something added later.

I started looking up what the codes mean. What I found referenced other information on the back of the print. I hadn’t seen anything but shining a flashlight on it, I could see more information. I mangled the scan to get enough contrast but here it is.

Hidden (as in faded to near invisibility) information.

Hidden (as in faded to near invisibility) information.


Upper left, lying on its back is a ‘5’. This was the fifth print in the pack.

“POLACOLOR ® 75 SPEED TYPE 108”. Interesting. This isn’t sepia, it’s color, just really faded.

The blob at the far right goes with the manufacturing code — it should end with a letter. I didn’t chop off the scan, the letter is just badly placed and only half on the print.

According to this document (820K PDF), ‘H’ is the month of manufacture, so, August. The first digit is the year of manufacture, so ‘8’, but 19_what_8? It would seem to be 1968 since the same document says “renamed Type 108 Polacolor 2, 1975”.

Screen grab from the document.  I'm confused

Screen grab from the document. I’m confused

The example shown in the document for Polaroid Land Pack Film is confusing. The example serial number is “H612591 P” and they give August, 1976. It seems that the example should say “Polacolor 2” since it’s after 1975. Unless they mean it was renamed to “Type 108 Polacolor” in 2, 1975 (as in February, 1975)? Or maybe the film name change doesn’t correspond to what’s printed on the back of the print?

OK, I will have to dig more for what decade. This other document (155K PDF) from 1998, shows better what the other numbers mean.

The next 2 digits in H 815341, the “15”, are numbers showing what machine made the film pack. The next 2 digits, “34” are more useful. Using the lookup table on page 7 of the 2nd document, “34” means the ‘A’ shift on the 12th of the month.

So, this print was made on machine 15, during ‘A’ shift, on 12 August, in either 1968 or 1978.

I’ll try dating the 3000 film that was in the camera. Of course, like Midge, the print may have nothing to do with the camera.

Update (still 1 March 2019): The 3000 film wasn’t as old as I thought. It was made 10 May 2001 so it’s no help trying to date the photo. At least I know for later films, the date codes work.

2nd update (still 1 March 2019):
Heritage Auctions had Andy Warhol Polaroids on Polacolor 2 and it does say it.

Polacolor 2 does say "Polacolor 2". H107621

Polacolor 2 does say “Polacolor 2”. H107621


They say “circa 1970s” for the photo but the film Warhol used was made in August of 1981. It can’t be 1971 because the film wasn’t labeled “Polacolor 2” until after 1975.

Finally, I’m happy enough with the evidence to say my print’s film was made 12 August 1968.

52 Cameras: # 167 — Canon Photura




Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 labeled “process before 2015-05”. I think I bought it new — it’s been in the freezer.

Processing and scanning by The Camera Shop of Santa Fe.

Plant buddies.  Time to re-pot the spider plant.

Plant buddies. Time to re-pot the spider plant.


Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite.  Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.

Still life with 1/4 scale Neanderthal skull, urn, and stalagmite. Ignored the parallax marks & cut off the urn.


The neighbor's cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed.  We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.

The neighbor’s cat waiting for feral food on top of our shed. We call him/her/not sure Cha-Ka.


Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.

Goober knows what to do on a cold, snowy day.


Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.

Sinclair mascot at the Pojoaque Dino Mart.


Saw blade target.  The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.

Saw blade target. The lens in this weird camera is sharp-sharp.