Tag Archives: Instax

52 Cameras: Fujifilm Instax 210




No more images for now. I only had 7 in the pack and 4 are in the video.

I did cover the exposure sensor and not the flash sensor when I tested the flash. In the video I put my finger over the wrong one. The exposure sensor tells it whether to fire (and what f-stop/shutter combination to use) and the flash sensor tells it when to stop the flash if it fired.

Something I forgot in the video: The guide number (GN) of the flash isn’t given but the manual does give a range, 0.9-3m (~3-10 feet).

The light calculator: https://toolstud.io/photo/light.php

About Light Value (LV) vs. Exposure Value (EV): As I understand it (and I’m mostly self-taught so chime in on the YouTube comments if I’m way off), at ISO 100 LV and EV are the same. Light value is how much light is present in the scene. Exposure value is how much light you’re letting into the camera. At ISO 100, it doesn’t matter which you use because that’s how the units are set up. ISO 800 film is 3 stops (100 to 200 is 1, 200 to 400 is another 1, and 400 to 800 makes 3) faster than 100 so the EV is 3 stops lower than the LV – it takes 3 stops less light to give the same exposure to ISO 800 than it does for ISO 100.

52 Cameras: Cigar Box Pinhole WPPD 2019


Sites mentioned in the video:
Mr Pinhole: http://mrpinhole.com/
Draw angles on-line: https://rechneronline.de/winkel/angles.php



This camera’s specs:
Focal length: 91mm
Pinhole diameter: 0.4mm
F Stop: f/226
Film diagonal using 4×5″: 163mm
Angle of view: 83.7 degrees
Film: Instax Wide 800 ISO, & Arista EDU Ultra 100 ISO (actually Fomapan 100)


The neighbor's red barn.  1/5 second at f/226.

The neighbor’s red barn. 1/5 second at f/226.


Not a lot to show. I had the Instax and 4 sheets in the holders, one of which became this…
Normally, it's solid green.  I played with it after seeing the color of the rinse water.

Normally, it’s solid green. I played with it after seeing the color of the rinse water.


Not news to anyone familiar with large format (I’m not) but the notch is so you know which way is which in the dark. When the notch is on top, at the right, the emulsion is facing you. In the above image, you’re looking at the backing.

I actually have a 4X5 developing tank. I got it when I bought most of a darkroom from a guy in Santa Fe. He’s getting out of film photography to concentrate on restoring an old Lotus. Sometimes you have to choose and whichever passion is pulling you the strongest wins. Any way, it’s cool but it’s made to do a bunch of sheets at once and it takes a LOT of chemicals. So, I used the “taco” method to develop. You fold, well, gently bend, and put a hair tie around the film to keep it from coming undone. The Yankee tank I usually use wasn’t quite deep enough but I also got a Paterson from the same guy and it clears the 4″ height of the negatives. No reels but you have to keep in the center cylinder so it’s light tight. You can squeeze in 4 tacos but I only had the three to develop.

There’s a good taco development visual how-to on Flickr by Tony.

Rocks near Chimayo, NM.

Rocks near Chimayo, NM.


More rocks.  I lost a lot of the image to a light leak.

More rocks. I lost a lot of the image to a light leak.


This one really is portrait format - I tilted the ball head on the tripod all the way over.

This one really is portrait format – I tilted the ball head on the tripod all the way over.

I’m nearly caught up! Well, I have to scan two rolls and develop and scan another but that’s pretty close to caught up.