Tag Archives: photography

52 Cameras: # 153 — Vivitar A35 Splash Proof




Photoworks ISO 400 film. Expired in 2006. Scanned on a Canon 9000f at 2400DPI and reduced to 1024 on the long side for upload.

The sensor apparently adjusts the flash. The film is 400 but it’s lost speed with age so probably more like 200. Indoor shots are underexposed so the scanner pumps up the gain so I get film grain plus scanner noise. Still, not bad for a cheap camera and cheap, old film.

The munchkin took this one.

The munchkin took this one.


Stairwell coming out of the city parking garage.

Stairwell coming out of the city parking garage.


My timing was off and I split the car with the pole.

My timing was off and I split the car with the pole.


I’ll add a few research screen grabs when I get home.

52 Cameras: # 152 — Cardboard Box Pinhole




The fugly beast itself.
325mm, F/428, 8X10" paper negative.  Custom  variable duration shutter (it's tape).

325mm, F/428, 8X10″ paper negative. Custom variable duration shutter (it’s tape).


Not a lot to show — I only took the two images.
Tree negative

Tree negative


This old cottonwood is 95% dead but the birds love it.

This old cottonwood is 95% dead but the birds love it.


The wind was trying to steal the box so the paper tore and the flaps got in the way.

The wind was trying to steal the box so the paper tore and the flaps got in the way.


Black Mesa and La Capilla de la Familia Sagrada

Black Mesa and La Capilla de la Familia Sagrada

52 Cameras: # 151 — Petri 7




Scanned at 2400DPI on a Canon Canoscan 9000f.
Frame numbers are as they came off the scanner and not the film frame numbers.
Another from the tail-end of the Canon T50.  Is it a double-exposure if the images are from different cameras?

Another from the tail-end of the Canon T50. Is it a double-exposure if the images are from different cameras?


Poor Jem - I caught him mid-sneeze.

Poor Jem – I caught him mid-sneeze.


One of those "oops" that's kind of cool.

One of those “oops” that’s kind of cool.

52 Cameras: # 149 — Meopta Milona




Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.

Cool effects with double exposure and a slow shutter speed.


This was more of a "catch it falling off the post because I don't have a tripod" kind of deal.

This was more of a “catch it falling off the post because I don’t have a tripod” kind of deal.


And this was a "Did I wind?  I'm pretty sure I wound."  I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.

And this was a “Did I wind? I’m pretty sure I wound.” I do love the pastels when Portra is overexposed.


Did I really use film that wasn't expired?  I could be on to something!

Did I really use film that wasn’t expired? I could be on to something!


I was cleaning the office/workshop while the pigeons ferried buckets of bits to Youtube. Not able to find anything clean, but less dangerous. I discovered I had one unused frame in an Instax Mini. I loaded it by feel into the Milona inside the dark bag, shot it, and then put it back into the Instax for processing. I didn’t get it lined up quite right but not bad.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

Zoe on Instax Mini in a 1952 Czech camera.

52 Cameras: # 146 — Utility Mfg. Co. Carlton (Falcon Miniature)




I metered for box speed (ISO 80) even though the film is 44 years old so most of the shots are underexposed. Honestly, I wasn’t expecting anything because of the cross-processing so this is a pleasant surprise.
Goober pining for the fjords

Goober pining for the fjords


Quite a bit of flare.

Quite a bit of flare.


Half of the image in the video.  Jem approaches Goober.

Half of the image in the video. Jem approaches Goober.


Dramatic tree.

Dramatic tree.


Is this thing on?  Spooky how much I'm looking like my dad.

Is this thing on? Spooky how much I’m looking like my dad.




A minor tear-down to clean it and measure the aperture.
The place to start -- there are only two screws.

The place to start — there are only two screws.


The whole lens/shutter assembly lifts off to reveal…
... This felt pad which makes it light tight.

… This felt pad which makes it light tight.


I wanted to get to the back of the lens to clean it but I couldn’t figure out how to remove the shutter. It turns out it’s just sitting there. The whole stack, the face-plate, lens, shutter, and felt, are held in place with the screws.
The outer shutter opens & the inner one closes so the aperture is already covered when you let go of the lever.

The outer shutter opens & the inner one closes so the aperture is already covered when you let go of the lever.


The time lever (right in the photo above) has a tab that holds the inner shutter open.
The back of the lens board.

The back of the lens board.


The body is just a light-tight box with a knob to turn the spool.

The body is just a light-tight box with a knob to turn the spool.


Simple is good. Simple survives. Other than cleaning the lens and a little gunk in the shutter, I didn’t have to do anything. This camera works as well as it did 77 years ago.

Process Kodacolor-X as Black & White

I recently shot with an old Carlton 127 camera. The only film I had was a roll of new-old stock Kodacolor-X.

ASA/ISO 80 -- Develop by Feb. 1974.

ASA/ISO 80 — Develop by Feb. 1974.


Kodacolor-X is process C-22 film, extinct except for a couple of specialty labs who mix their own chemicals from scratch. Since I shot the film (not a precious roll of family photos found in a relative’s attic), it’s not worth the price or the wait to send it off. I’ve read here and there about cross-processing old color print film in B&W chemicals and even had some success (-ish) with Kodachrome. Worth a shot so here’s what I did:

I used Kodak HC-110 developer at dilution H. H is an unofficial mix using 1 part developer concentrate to 63 parts water. That’s the US strength developer where dilution B is 1+31.

I used a Yankee plastic tank and lower reel that can adjust for 127 film. For 127, the tank takes 420mL of solution.

Everything was done at 20C/68F. I developed for 10 minutes agitating the first 15 seconds (about 10 inversions) and then 4 inversions every minute for the remainder of the time.

One minute stop bath, using Kodak Indicator Stop at 16mL/liter, inverting the first 15 seconds (10 inversions) and then letting it sit for the remainder of the time.

Ilford Rapid fixer mixed to normal film strength (1+4) for 5 minutes using the same agitation as the developer.

I rinsed using the Ilford method: fill tank & invert 5X; Re-fill & invert 10X; Re-fill & invert 20X. I gave it an extra 20X rinse with some Photo-Flo for good measure and hung it to dry.

The base is really dark orange but Kodacolor-X doesn’t have the nasty, black anti-halation layer that Kodachrome has, and it scanned OK. Boosting the gain on the scanner brings out the noise and grain, but not too bad for what I was working with. I used VueScan software. The Canon software won’t do negatives without the film holder but I don’t have a 127 holder.

I’ll try scanning again after trying a bleaching step, soaking the film in fixer with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) added.

Kodacolor negative.

Kodacolor negative.


Inversion of the snapshot.

Inversion of the snapshot.