Tag Archives: photography

Phound Photos Volume 15

This roll of Kodak MAX 400 (C-41 color print film, not T-MAX) has been sitting in the refrigerator for a while. It was in the Canon AL-1 when I bought it in late December 2019. I’m trying to work my way through more found film before the chemicals go bad. I’m using the Cinestill “Color Simplified” 2-bath kit. It’s the 1st batch I’ve used so I have no idea of its staying power vs the Unicolor kit I usually use.

On to the images.

Gorgeous dog. Want to steal.

Gorgeous dog. Want to steal.


Wind chime.

Wind chime.


Frozen bird feeder.

Frozen bird feeder.


Frozen bird feeder detail. Even the perch has ice.

Frozen bird feeder detail. Even the perch has ice.


Icicles.

Icicles.


Some color correction. The film survived its journey through a thrift store to me in pretty good shape.

52 Cameras: New Taiwan Pantium DL1000

Trashcam: “any camera whose value at least doubles when loaded with film.”
From http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Trashcam

It has a taking lens, a viewfinder lens, a waist-level lens, and a mirror. Pseudo TLR? TLR? ThreeLR?

PDF manual on the Manuals & Ephemera page.



From Beware the Pantium, my Son at I still ♥ film: “And my favourite part – a lens cap which says ‘camera’ on it. Given the amount of times I’ve tried to put my lens caps back on the kettle, this is super handy.”

My take is this: With all the effort put into fake bits to make it look, fooling no one, like a real camera, they could have built a real camera.

There may be some images here at some point. In spite of this being a valueless piece of carp when it works, I’m going to try to fix it. After the 1st tear-down, I had to go back in because I had a wire across the frame counter dial and the waist level viewfinder mirror came off. It has two plastic posts with the ends melted to hold the mirror. The spring that resets the counter when the back is opened broke and then my repair broke. I think I’ll replace it with a rubber band. It will make sense when I post tear-down & (hopefully) repair entries. I do love a pointless challenge.

52 Cameras: Vivitar PS:35




Another found photo. Kodak Max 400.

Another found photo. Kodak Max 400.


Rio Grande

Rio Grande


Trees on the way to the river.

Trees on the way to the river.


Jem checking out the stray cats outside.

Jem checking out the stray cats outside.


Not sure what happened here but I like it.

Not sure what happened here but I like it.




Sometimes getting information about a camera is pretty piecemeal.

It's actually a pretty sophisticated little camera. I may try to find the older, non-DX version to get more control.

It’s actually a pretty sophisticated little camera. I may try to find the older, non-DX version to get more control.


I can't remember if this is from an auction site, a wiki, or someone's blog.

I can’t remember if this is from an auction site, a wiki, or someone’s blog.


A screen grab of the box on an auction site gave me flash distance and max ISO.

A screen grab of the box on an auction site gave me flash distance and max ISO.


A tiny blurb in the September 1984 issue of Popular Science has shutter and aperture information. Typo - should say f/16, not f/1.6.

A tiny blurb in the September 1984 issue of Popular Science has shutter and aperture information. Typo – should say f/16, not f/1.6.


My test roll.

My test roll.

52 Cameras: Thornward Dandy No. 5


Sources & mentions in the video:

Label & strut pictures. And quite a collection:
http://dtristramludwig.com/collection.html

1905 Montgomery Ward catalog:
http://www.piercevaubel.com/cam/catalogs/1905wardslp096.htm

Wollensak Junior info & 1903 catalog:
https://alphaxbetax.com/Wollensak%20Lens%20and%20Shutter%20Compendium/#Junior

1912-1913 Wollensak Lens and Shutter Catalog:
https://alphaxbetax.com/wollensak-catalogs-etc/

Aperture, f-Stops, and the U.S. System:
http://throughavintagelens.com/2010/01/the-u-s-f-stop-system/



What looks like a reflection at the bottom of the image is a note written on the back with a marker. It doesn’t show up on the paper but the scanner light brought it out on the image.
Arista paper negative. This was in the 1st batch & I over-processed a bit. The contrast is cool but not a lot of detail.

Arista paper negative. This was in the 1st batch & I over-processed a bit. The contrast is cool but not a lot of detail.


Arista paper negative. A Mamiya TLR I'll feature soon. Bit of a light leak.

Arista paper negative. A Mamiya TLR I’ll feature soon. Bit of a light leak.


Arista 4x5 film. Contrast is from shooting into the sunset. Cropped for light leak.

Arista 4×5 film. Contrast is from shooting into the sunset. Cropped for light leak.

Tougodo Hit Teardown

Camera video with images is here.

The camera was working on bulb (B) most of the time but not instant (I). The lens was in dire need of cleaning too.

This isn’t a complete tear-down. I didn’t open the viewfinder or remove the wind knob. This started just as notes for myself so there are some gaps in the images. I’ll try to fill in with text instructions.

Remove the lens ring inside the body. It's a left hand thread. I couldn't get a lens wrench past the film gate so I used a couple of small screwdrivers.

Remove the lens ring inside the body. It’s a left hand thread. I couldn’t get a lens wrench past the film gate so I used a couple of small screwdrivers.


The lens ring also holds the inner copper (?) body. It won't quite come out without removing the wind knob but it wasn't necessary for getting to the shutter & lens.

The lens ring also holds the inner copper (?) body. It won’t quite come out without removing the wind knob but it wasn’t necessary for getting to the shutter & lens.


The lens/shutter assembly comes out after removing the ring. The little screw is the Instant/Bulb selector. It didn't need to come off but I didn't know that at the time. The trim plate acts as a washer so it might be part of the lens distance as well as being cosmetic.

The lens/shutter assembly comes out after removing the ring. The little screw is the Instant/Bulb selector. It didn’t need to come off but I didn’t know that at the time. The trim plate acts as a washer so it might be part of the lens distance as well as being cosmetic.


The lens surround is press-fitted to the shutter. A gentle squeeze to the shutter body near the I/B selector (there's a little bump out on the shutter body) while pulling with your thumbnail near the shutter switch will pop it off.

The lens surround is press-fitted to the shutter. A gentle squeeze to the shutter body near the I/B selector (there’s a little bump out on the shutter body) while pulling with your thumbnail near the shutter switch will pop it off.


There's the culprit. The spring had come off of its post. Sitting there without tension for however many years may be why my shutter is fast. If it didn't need cleaning (and if I wasn't curious) I could have put the spring on the post and reassembled here.

There’s the culprit. The spring had come off of its post. Sitting there without tension for however many years may be why my shutter is fast. If it didn’t need cleaning (and if I wasn’t curious) I could have put the spring on the post and reassembled here.


The I/B selector screw screws into this springy copper bit. The springy bit provides friction so the selector doesn't flop around. The end of the screw blocks the spring post on the inner (brass) shutter to provide bulb.

The I/B selector screw screws into this springy copper bit. The springy bit provides friction so the selector doesn’t flop around. The end of the screw blocks the spring post on the inner (brass) shutter to provide bulb.


The big brass screw holds the outer shutter and the outer shutter return spring. The upper part of the spring presses against the shutter body and the lower part presses against the edge of the outer shutter blade (the black part). See the previous image for its proper location.

The big brass screw holds the outer shutter and the outer shutter return spring. The upper part of the spring presses against the shutter body and the lower part presses against the edge of the outer shutter blade (the black part). See the previous image for its proper location.


The copper springy bit. This is reversed from how it goes in. The round part goes in first toward the back of the shutter body, away from the lens.

The copper springy bit. This is reversed from how it goes in. The round part goes in first toward the back of the shutter body, away from the lens.


The inner shutter pivots on this flatter brass screw. It has an unthreaded part that acts as a spacer and shaft for the shutter.

The inner shutter pivots on this flatter brass screw. It has an unthreaded part that acts as a spacer and shaft for the shutter.


With the inner shutter removed, you can see the aperture. It's held in with the small brass screw.

With the inner shutter removed, you can see the aperture. It’s held in with the small brass screw.


Finally, all the way to the bottom. The screw also acts as a spacer for the aperture. That's some quality blackening on the aperture.

Finally, all the way to the bottom. The screw also acts as a spacer for the aperture. That’s some quality blackening on the aperture.

Not shown: 1) Cleaned the shutter parts. I used cotton swabs and lighter fluid. 2) Re-blackened the aperture with a permanent marker. 3) Cleaned the lens front and back with lens cleaner. I doubt if it is coated so window cleaner might be OK.

I tried pre-fitting the inner shutter screw but I couldn't seem to get the screw lined up with the hole in the aperture.

I tried pre-fitting the inner shutter screw but I couldn’t seem to get the screw lined up with the hole in the aperture.


Instead, I used a tapered lens wrench piece to line up the aperture in the inner shutter and the aperture and then inserted the screw.

Instead, I used a tapered lens wrench piece to line up the aperture in the inner shutter and the aperture and then inserted the screw.


That’s pretty much it. Do the steps in reverse to reassemble. Before I put the lens/shutter assembly back on the body I did shutter speed tests.

This is a sequence of stills from a 240 frames per second video. I did about 12 shutter tests. Shutter opening didn't vary much - most were open for four frames.

This is a sequence of stills from a 240 frames per second video. I did about 12 shutter tests. Shutter opening didn’t vary much – most were open for four frames.

1/240 frames per second = 0.004166666666667 seconds per frame (~4.2ms).
Open for 4 frames = shutter open for 0.016666666666667 (~16.7ms).
Turn it into a nice shutter speed style fraction: 1/X = 0.0167. X = 60.
If I’d been thinking, since 240 is a multiple of 60 and 4 and the shutter was open for 4 frames, I could have just done it in my head. Duh.

In my defense, I do this for a lot of old, slow shutters and it’s rarely this clean.

52 Cameras: Tougodo Hit




Camera-wiki.org has a great page on the history of Tougodo (sometimes spelled Togodo).

A tear-down post is here.

Not much to show that’s not in the video. If I get crazy and try again, I’ll post more here.

Ilford SFX 200. Spooky backyard tree is spookier with ND & red filters (3 stops).

Ilford SFX 200. Spooky backyard tree is spookier with ND & red filters (3 stops).


Kodak T-MAX 100. The truck window tint was just the right amount of filter.

Kodak T-MAX 100. The truck window tint was just the right amount of filter.

Update: I used some little snips from film & loaded a couple of single frames. What do you even call the piece of film that comes out of the canister but doesn’t quite reach the shutter frame? Any way, the opposite end from the leader.

The tail of the Fujicolor I used in the Vivitar PS:35

The tail of the Fujicolor I used in the Vivitar PS:35


The tail of the Walgreens/AGFA I shot in the Nikkormat EL. Oops, snipped a little too much.

The tail of the Walgreens/AGFA I shot in the Nikkormat EL. Oops, snipped a little too much.