Tag Archives: photography

52 Cameras: # 176 — Cigar Box Pinhole WPPD 2019


Sites mentioned in the video:
Mr Pinhole: http://mrpinhole.com/
Draw angles on-line: https://rechneronline.de/winkel/angles.php



This camera’s specs:
Focal length: 91mm
Pinhole diameter: 0.4mm
F Stop: f/226
Film diagonal using 4×5″: 163mm
Angle of view: 83.7 degrees
Film: Instax Wide 800 ISO, & Arista EDU Ultra 100 ISO (actually Fomapan 100)


The neighbor's red barn.  1/5 second at f/226.

The neighbor’s red barn. 1/5 second at f/226.


Not a lot to show. I had the Instax and 4 sheets in the holders, one of which became this…
Normally, it's solid green.  I played with it after seeing the color of the rinse water.

Normally, it’s solid green. I played with it after seeing the color of the rinse water.


Not news to anyone familiar with large format (I’m not) but the notch is so you know which way is which in the dark. When the notch is at the upper right corner, the emulsion is facing you.

I actually have a 4X5 developing tank. I got it when I bought most of a darkroom from a guy in Santa Fe. He’s getting out of film photography to concentrate on restoring an old Lotus. Sometimes you have to choose and whichever passion is pulling you the strongest wins. Any way, it’s cool but it’s made to do a bunch of sheets at once and it takes a LOT of chemicals. So, I used the “taco” method to develop. You fold, well, gently bend, and put a hair tie around the film to keep it from coming undone. The Yankee tank I usually use wasn’t quite deep enough but I also got a Paterson from the same guy and it clears the 4″ height of the negatives. No reels but you have to keep in the center cylinder so it’s light tight. You can squeeze in 4 tacos but I only had the three to develop.

There’s a good taco development visual how-to on Flickr by Tony.

Rocks near Chimayo, NM.

Rocks near Chimayo, NM.


More rocks.  I lost a lot of the image to a light leak.

More rocks. I lost a lot of the image to a light leak.


This one really is portrait format - I tilted the ball head on the tripod all the way over.

This one really is portrait format – I tilted the ball head on the tripod all the way over.

I’m nearly caught up! Well, I have to scan two rolls and develop and scan another but that’s pretty close to caught up.

52 Cameras: # 175 — Coronet Ambassador




Nice coverage by the old lens.  6X9cm is a lot of film.

Nice coverage by the old lens. 6X9cm is a lot of film.


This one is cropped & contrast tweaked - not sure if it was lens flare or a light leak.

This one is cropped & contrast tweaked – not sure if it was lens flare or a light leak.


I scanned at 4800DPI so it made some huge (20+MB) files. Preview.app on the laptop was really struggling to resize the images. The images displayed while the hamster wheel was working full blast are interesting.
Screen grab of the tree image in the video during resizing

Screen grab of the tree image in the video during resizing

52 Cameras: # 172 — Spartus Full-Vue




Made In Chicago Museum’s article on Spartus, Jack Galter, & the “Chicago Cluster”.

Boys’ Life from Google Books.

Boys' Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section

Boys’ Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section


You talkin' to me?

You talkin’ to me?


You talik' to ME?!

You talik’ to ME?!


Nope, just munching.

Nope, just munching.


Photographer's shadow

Photographer’s shadow


At first i thought I took this one but it has a frame number from before the bend in the film.
Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree - we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.

Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree – we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.


The whole Instax Mini frame

The whole Instax Mini frame

52 Cameras: # 170 — Sony DSC-H7


I glossed over a lot of the features, face detect, in-camera effects like sepia and saturation, exposure compensation besides bracketing, etc. Even Sony divided the information into a setup guide, instruction manual, and handbook — probably 250 pages worth.



Phound Photos Volume 9 has some of the found images from the memory stick.


18 Jan 2019 - I used GIMP to fix the perspective & adjusted the levels.  The deep shadows fooled the meter.

18 Jan 2019 – I used GIMP to fix the perspective & adjusted the levels. The deep shadows fooled the meter.


21 Jan 2019 - Waiting for moonrise.  The camera biffed the white balance (WB) but GIMP fixed it up.

21 Jan 2019 – Waiting for moonrise. The camera biffed the white balance (WB) but GIMP fixed it up.


28 Jan 2019 - M at Plaza Cafe.

28 Jan 2019 – M at Plaza Cafe.


10 Apr 2019 - Macro is hard in high wind.  The camera did a great job during a rare lull.

10 Apr 2019 – Macro is hard in high wind. The camera did a great job during a rare lull.


10 Apr 2019 - Lupines (I think) in the yard.  Bokeh's not great but not bad.

10 Apr 2019 – Lupines (I think) in the yard. Bokeh’s not great but not bad.


10 Apr 2019 -  Shot through a filthy window at max zoom (78/465mm equiv). I tweaked WB & shadows.

10 Apr 2019 – Shot through a filthy window at max zoom (78/465mm equiv). I tweaked WB & shadows.

Developing C-41 Color Print Film in Black & White Developer

Developing notes
I used Kodak HC-110 developer. I like it and it is what I have right now. I used dilution H, which is 1 part developer to 63 parts water. This is straight developer concentrate, not a stock solution. The concentrate is the US strength, where dilution B is 1+31 — I’ve read that HC-110 comes in a weaker dilution across the pond. I’ve never seen it or used it, just throwing the warning out there.

One thing about using more dilute developer is to make sure you have enough developer concentrate in the solution. The Yankee tank I used calls for 340mL of developer for one roll of 35mm film. Easy enough — divide 340 by 64 to get the amount of syrup I need. It comes out to 5.3125mL. However, you need at least 6mL of HD-110 syrup to have enough of the active chemicals to convert the exposed portions of a roll of 35mm film to metallic silver. So… 6mL X 64 = 384mL total. I use dilution H a lot so I made a mark on a graduated cylinder with a permanent marker at 384mL. That way, I just put in 6mL of syrup and fill to the mark with water. Use dilution H as a one-shot — don’t re-use.

An oral syringe for measuring medicine for children (cats in my case) is perfect for this. I fill a 3mL syringe twice, squirt it into the cylinder, add some water into the cylinder, suck and squirt the water a few times to make sure I get all of the syrup out of the syringe, then top off to 384mL.

I got the most useful information about HC-110 from this page at Covington Innovations.

I used Kodak indicator stop bath at a dilution of 16mL/liter. You might see the recommended dilution stated as 1:64 or 1:63. It’s meant to be one part of a total solution of 64 parts. That’s why I like the 1+## notation rather than a ratio — you don’t have to guess whether the writer means 1 part plus ## water or 1 part of ## solution. It can be re-used and changes color (the indicator) when exhausted but it’s inexpensive so I don’t re-use it.

*The stop bath concentrate is a strong acetic acid. Strong enough to require ground shipping only in the US, so don’t get it on you. It’s also flammable and an inhalation hazard, so seriously, treat it with respect and protect your eyes.*

I used Ilford Rapid Fixer at 1+4. I normally don’t re-use the fixer either. It’s more expensive than the stop but I shoot such a bizarre mix of color print film (usually developed as color print negatives), slides, B&W film, and digital that my problem is usually shelf life rather than chemical exhaustion. If I’m doing a large run, I might re-use. In this case, I didn’t know what the color print film might leave in the solutions, so definitely one-shot.

With everything mixed, we’re finally ready to go.

Everything was done at a temperature of 68F (~20C).

Develop for 11 minutes. The data sheet calls for agitation every 30 seconds. I have a tendency to agitate too vigorously and dilution H is a little more forgiving so I generally do 4 inversions immediately after filling, smack the tank on the counter as I set it down to loosen any bubbles, and repeat at the beginning of each subsequent minute.

Stop for 1 minute. I did 4 inversions + smack at the beginning and then let it sit for the rest of the minute.

Fix for 5 minutes. Ilford recommends 2-5 minutes for B&W films. This was an experiment so getting anything was the goal. I used the same agitation scheme as the developing step.

Wash using the Ilford method: “After fixing, fill the spiral tank with water at the same temperature, +/-5ºC (9ºF), as the processing solutions and invert it five times. Drain the water away and refill. Invert the tank ten times. Once more drain the water away and refill. Finally, invert the tank twenty times and drain the water away.”

I did an extra 20 inversion wash step for good measure.

I filled the tank and added a couple of drops of Kodak Photo-Flo and did 20 inversions.

I took the film out, gave a loud YES! when I saw images, squeegeed with a cellulose sponge and hung to dry.

52 Cameras: # 169 — Petri Color 35E




* Notes on developing C-41 in B&W chemicals.

Interesting that both rolls, shot about a year apart, are partly shot at the Santa Fe National Cemetery. Some moiré pattern on the 1st image here – I must not have had the film secure in the negative holder.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.

C-41 developed in B&W chemicals with no color correction.


She knows me too well.

She knows me too well.


Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.

Lots of grain & scanner noise but nice color and exposure.


Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.

Iron gate near Il Vicino Pizza in Santa Fe.


Seems a bit late but OK.

Seems a bit late but OK.

52 Cameras: # 168 — Franka Solida I




Kodak Tri-X 400, develop by 12/2016. I bought it new and it’s been frozen. Developed in HC-110 H (1+63) for 9 minutes at 68F. Scanned on the CanoScan 9000f at 2400DPI. I used both Canon’s software and Vuescan and picked whichever version I liked better. The bird bath in the video is a merged image from both.
It's only fair -- I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura

It’s only fair — I took a picture of the Franka with the Photura


I think the vignetting is not entirely the camera’s fault. I was pretty close with 400 film and the Vivitar flash I used didn’t actually have the combination of speed and distance on its chart so I kind of winged it and used f/32.
The wedding bouquet after a few weeks

The wedding bouquet after a few weeks


The junk at the top is from over-agitating during development.
Playing with the double exposure

Playing with the double exposure


Zoomed in to clean up dust specks, I noticed Jem’s face in the branches (screen grab PNG).
Detail -- Jem The Cheshire Cat

Detail — Jem The Cheshire Cat