Tag Archives: pinhole

52 Cameras: # 129 — Pinhole cameras WPPD 2017


Links mentioned in the video:

Drill Your Own Precision Pinhole Apertures


http://www.mrpinhole.com
http://pinholeday.org



I like to show different images here but I was processing as we went to check exposure so we only got 3 from the paint can camera.

A chart from Mr. Pinhole showed 2.5 minutes. My meter app showed 1.5. We split the difference at 2 minutes and ended up overexposed. It was bright out.

I tweaked the levels a little bit.

I tweaked the levels a little bit.


I backed off the exposure time for this one.

I backed off the exposure time for this one.


You can’t see the close-focus distortion from the curved plane in the video.

The scanner at work, a Canon print/scan/fax thing, was giving me bad reflections from the clear plastic on the Instax frames so i had to adjust. They’re underexposed to start with — f/256 is pretty dim.

Tusker and Melon -- my WPPD contribution.

Tusker and Melon — my WPPD contribution.


Side-lit Buddha.

Side-lit Buddha.


Some of M's pots.

Some of M’s pots.




My kludge of a darkroom…
Foam core poster board painted black on the window.

Foam core poster board painted black on the window.


Black craft paper and tape around the door.  Towel at the bottom.

Black craft paper and tape around the door. Towel at the bottom.


It worked, it was black-black. Then I remembered when I bought a guy’s old darkroom stuff, I got a…
Safe light!  This is paper, not film.

Safe light! This is paper, not film.


Develop...

Develop…


Stop...

Stop…


Fix (It's a small bathroom)...

Fix (It’s a small bathroom)…


After a good rinse, hang to dry.

After a good rinse, hang to dry.

52 Cameras: # 99 — Polaroid CU-5 Pinhole




Thanks to the folks at Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day for getting me started in another addictive diversion.

1200DPI scans on a CanoScan 9000f. I scanned in color and decided to leave them that way.

The scanned images in the video and the ones posted here are unedited except for resizing. The negative scans had levels adjusted before reversing to positive. It’s kind of a cool effect doing it that way — I just have to reverse my thinking to imagine what it will look like.

Socorro Peak from the Socorro Holiday Inn Express.

Socorro Peak from the Socorro Holiday Inn Express.

I haven’t scanned the Socorro Peak negative yet. I put it between two pieces of paper to protect it not realizing it still had wet developer goo on it. I washed off some of the emulsion with the glued-on paper.

Negative from my test shot.  It's grainier but the boosted contrast really adds something.

Negative from my test shot. It’s grainier but the boosted contrast really adds something.

The tire swing.  Not bad for a pinhole but kind of "meh".

The tire swing. Not bad for a pinhole but kind of “meh”.

Tire swing negative.  The grain and contrast give it a melancholy feel.

Tire swing negative. The grain and contrast give it a melancholy feel.

Curly grass in the back yard.

Curly grass in the back yard.

Curly grass negative.

Curly grass negative.

Some people have gotten sharp images using pinhole cameras. I’m not there yet. I’m going to try more experiments and not wait until the week before next year’s Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day to cobble something together.

52 Cameras: Camera 63.5 part 2 – Bell+Howell Ultra Compact 35 (28mm) — converted to pinhole

Shot for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, 26 April 2015.

Expired Kodak 400 film processed and scanned by my good friends at The Camera Shop Of Santa Fe.

I didn’t think to factor in the short lens to film plane distance so the image circle doesn’t cover the 35mm film frame.

The image I submitted:

Teepees in Taos.

Teepees in Taos.

The camera.

The camera.

Some more from the second roll (also expired Kodak 400).

Looking up through a gnarly tree in Taos.

Looking up through a gnarly tree in Taos.

The vignetting is nice with the flowers.

The vignetting is nice with the flowers.

Interesting effect shooting into the sun.

Interesting effect shooting into the sun.

The next three were taken at the Classical Gas Museum in Embudo, NM.

Long before I was a veg, I loved the patty melt at Vip's Big Boy in Santa Fe.  Big Boy is a little creepy.

Long before I was a veg, I loved the patty melt at Vip’s Big Boy in Santa Fe. Big Boy is a little creepy.

Huntin' dinosaurs.

Huntin’ dinosaurs.

Hubcap collection.

Hubcap collection.

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day: 26 May 2015 — My backup

I didn’t end up using the digital camera (Canon 60D) as much as I thought I would. Most of the shots with the Bell+Howell, I winged it.

The conversion was pretty straightforward — The metal pinhole from the cardboard camera from last year taped to a T-mount lens adapter for the Canon. I only used the needle to make sure the hole was clear and clean of cat hair.

The bits, minus the tape.  Lens adapter, pinhole, and plastic from a Fuji Polaroid film pack.

The bits, minus the tape. Lens adapter, pinhole, and plastic from a Fuji Polaroid film pack.

Fully assembled "lens".

Fully assembled “lens”.

Mounted and ready to roll.

Mounted and ready to roll.

My favorite shot from the Canon. I think the pinhole is larger than necessary so the kit will give something to a kid using the Ridley camera.

Cow skull at a museum on NM 64.

Cow skull at a museum on NM 64.

52 Cameras: Camera 63.5 part 1 – Bell+Howell Ultra Compact 35 (28mm)

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day is April 26, 2015.

No video for this one. This is the plastic fantastic Bell+Howell Ultra Compact 35 (28mm) reborn as a pinhole camera.

Stock -- what kind of mangling will it take?

Stock — what kind of mangling will it take?

So far so good -- only four screws to get the front off.

So far so good — only four screws to get the front off.

Clever interlock -- with the lens cover closed, the button can't push the shutter actuator down.

Clever interlock — with the lens cover closed, the button can’t push the shutter actuator down.

With the cover open, the actuator can move down.  That one piece of plastic trips the shutter and releases the film winder which increments the frame counter.

With the cover open, the actuator can move down. That one piece of plastic trips the shutter and releases the film winder which increments the frame counter.

Actuator and cover mechanism removed.  The lens is held in place with a twist-lock.  With the lenses off, there's one screw and a keyhole arrangement like the shutter actuator and cover mechanism.

Actuator and cover mechanism removed. The lens is held in place with a twist-lock. With the lenses off, there’s one screw and a keyhole arrangement like the shutter actuator and cover mechanism.

The shutter is similar to an old Brownie -- pull against a spring and let it snap back.  The metal serves no purpose other than giving the camera a little heft.

The shutter is similar to an old Brownie — pull against a spring and let it snap back. The metal serves no purpose other than giving the camera a little heft.

The shutter.

The shutter.

With the outer lens removed, you can see the aperture and the inner lens.

With the outer lens removed, you can see the aperture and the inner lens.

Aperture and inner lens removed.

Aperture and inner lens removed.

I never found the f-stop for sure so I decided to measure.  28mm / 2.38mm = 11.76 or f/12 ish.

I never found the f-stop for sure so I decided to measure. 28mm / 2.38mm = 11.76 or f/12 ish.

Like the Canon's pinhole from last year, I used plastic from a Fuji instant film pack.  The side was all I needed for this camera.

Like the Canon’s pinhole from last year, I used plastic from an Impossible Project a Fuji instantfilm pack. The side was all I needed for this camera.

Checking the fit so I don't have to sand once the pinhole is drilled.

Checking the fit so I don’t have to sand once the pinhole is drilled.

Without the lenses and the plastic disc aperture, there was a lot of slop.  I tried one foam washer but it was still loose so I added another one.

Without the lenses and the plastic disc aperture, there was a lot of slop. I tried one foam washer but it was still loose so I added another one.

This one presses down on the pinhole washer keeping things nice and snug.

This one presses down on the pinhole washer keeping things nice and snug.

Guts reassembled.  I put the shutter actuator back so I still have a working frame counter.  I decided not to cut off the nub of the cover switch so I can put it all back together when I'm done -- no permanent modifications.

Guts reassembled. I put the shutter actuator back so I still have a working frame counter. I decided not to cut off the nub of the cover switch so I can put it all back together when I’m done — no permanent modifications.

It's actually a tiny pinhole and nice and round -- I checked with a 32X loupe.  Holdng it up to the light with the back open while I took a macro shot with another camera made things a bit blurry.

It’s actually a tiny pinhole and nice and round — I checked with a 32X loupe. Holdng it up to the light with the back open while I took a macro shot with another camera made things a bit blurry.

By keeping the unmodified shutter actuator, I still have the interlock. As soon as I open the cover, light will hit the film through the pinhole. I need to hit the shutter button while the cover is open to allow wind-on and the frame counter, and then close the lens cover to end the exposure. I have no idea of the diameter of the pinhole and hence no idea of the f-stop. Like last year, I’ll cheat a little and use a pinhole on the 60D in aperture priority mode, set to the same ISO as the film in the Bell+Howell, to get a shutter value. Add a little time for reciprocity failure if needed and hopefully I’ll get some decent exposures. I haven’t decided on film but I’ll probably use a 36 exposure roll so I can bracket like crazy and maybe get 12 usable shots. Time to hit the freezer and see what I have.

52 Cameras: Week 35 part 2 — Ridley’s Pinhole Camera

I used expired Kodak Max 800 (02/2003).

Mixed results. The exposure isn’t bad — I set the Canon with the pinhole lens to ISO 800 and used its shutter time to ballpark the timing for the cardboard camera. I didn’t stabilize myself well enough so there’s a lot of blur. There’s a lot of frame overlap too so I had to scan by hand and crop the overlap. The directions said to use 1 1/2 turns for the first ten frames and single turns after that. It wasn’t enough — the pinhole camera laid down some pretty wide pictures.

I was about half way through the roll when we stopped at a rest area on I-25. Crazy windy. The wind blew the camera out of my hand and it pretty much exploded when it hit the blacktop about 50 feet away. I put it in the dark bag and rolled the film back into the canister but the damage was done. I got about six frames that weren’t obliterated when the camera cracked open. Surprisingly, the last frame (the last picture below) wasn’t ruined.

Pretty sure the light leaks are from the explosion. I had this baby taped up pretty well.

Not so pretty once I was done sealing it.

Not so pretty once I was done sealing it.

M's bag and the passenger-side mirror of my car.  Not sure what I was going for but I don't think it was this.

M’s bag and the passenger-side mirror of my car. Not sure what I was going for but I don’t think it was this.

My sweetie enjoying a delicious adult beverage.

My sweetie enjoying a delicious adult beverage.

The scene of the crime.  The double exposure gives you some idea of how much the gusts were pushing me back and forth.

The scene of the crime. The wobbly exposure gives you some idea of how much the gusts were pushing me back and forth.

52 Cameras: Week 35 part 1.5 — Pinhole Camera

There was a delay with processing so I won’t have film from the cardboard camera back until May 5th. For now, I have images taken on Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (April 27, 2014) using a Canon 60D and a homemade pinhole “lens”.

EF-M42 adapter with pinhole in plastic from Impossible film pack.

EF-M42 adapter with pinhole in plastic from Impossible film pack.

Basilica of San Albino in Mesilla, NM.  ISO 800, 1/20 sec, f/whatever the pinhole turned out to be.

Basilica of San Albino in Mesilla, NM. ISO 800, 1/20 sec, f/whatever the pinhole turned out to be.

She doesn’t like this next picture but I can’t resist the pun. The wind kept inflating her shirt and making her look like a pill bug. It was spooky-windy driving north on I-25. I-10 between El Paso and Las Cruces was closed because of the wind the previous day.

Derrière at Derry Arrey.  ISO 800, 1/8 sec., f/?

Derrière at Derry Arrey. ISO 800, 1/8 sec., f/?

Mexican handbag photo by M.  ISO 800, 1.6 sec., f/?

Mexican handbag photo by M. ISO 800, 1.6 sec., f/?

Back in Santa Fe, about to have some Backroad Pizza.  ISO 800, 4 sec., f/?

Back in Santa Fe, about to have some Backroad Pizza. ISO 800, 4 sec., f/?