Tag Archives: TLR

52 Cameras: # 181 — Kodak Brownie Starflex




Barrancas at Pojoaque Pueblo

Barrancas at Pojoaque Pueblo


Light through the leaves

Light through the leaves


Dramatic sky

Dramatic sky


This image was in the video but this is before I cropped & cleaned up. There’s a head in the upper left. He noticed I was shooting a film camera and we talked a bit. His name’s Siddho and he’s a photographer in Santa Fe.
Siddho's head

Siddho’s head




A shout out to Bob for giving me the film. He’s the same guy who lent me his Nikon FM.
Original price (sticker underneath)

Original price (sticker underneath)


Later price and then 1/2 price

Later price and then 1/2 price


Exposure instructions right on the backing paper

Exposure instructions right on the backing paper


It performed well for film 37 years past its "develop by" date

It performed well for film 37 years past its “develop by” date

52 Cameras: # 172 — Spartus Full-Vue




Made In Chicago Museum’s article on Spartus, Jack Galter, & the “Chicago Cluster”.

Boys’ Life from Google Books.

Boys' Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section

Boys’ Life Sep 1953 page 61 “Hobby Hows” section


You talkin' to me?

You talkin’ to me?


You talik' to ME?!

You talik’ to ME?!


Nope, just munching.

Nope, just munching.


Photographer's shadow

Photographer’s shadow


At first i thought I took this one but it has a frame number from before the bend in the film.
Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree - we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.

Landscape with scraggly catalpa tree – we also have a scraggly catalpa tree.


The whole Instax Mini frame

The whole Instax Mini frame

Attempted Repair of the Argoflex Seventy-Five

Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. Here’s the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

It’s pretty easy to get inside to the shutter. The first tear-down was more thorough — I removed the insert that goes from the back of the shutter to the film plane and disassembled the viewfinder. There are two screws inside the light-tight chamber.

Four screws on the front.

Four screws on the front.


This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector.  It will immediately fall out.

This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector. It will immediately fall out.


Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.

Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.


I completely removed the VF during the cleaning tear-down to get to the lens and mirror. The VF hood is a pain to get back in its slot so don’t do it unless you have to.
With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.

With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.


The four front screws also hold the lens board -- it pops right out.

The four front screws also hold the lens board — it pops right out.


Without the shutter cocked, you can't really see the part the selector works.

Without the shutter cocked, you can’t really see the part the selector works.


This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.

This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.


The triangular piece coming in at the left selects "instantaneous" or "time".

The triangular piece coming in at the left selects “instantaneous” or “time”.


Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.

Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.


One screw at the bottom.

One screw at the bottom.


Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.

Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.


The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.

The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.


Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn't move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).

Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn’t move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).


It's a two-piece shutter.  The red opens followed by the rear that closes.  The triangle holds the rear open.

It’s a two-piece shutter. The red opens followed by the rear that closes. The triangle holds the rear open.


I thought this wasn't pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.

I thought this wasn’t pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.


Bad alignment but I bent it down.  It also increased the friction.

Bad alignment but I bent it down. It also increased the friction.


Holding the triangle down with a small drill bit, the shutter worked at the instantaneous setting every time. Bending the selector seemed to work but it isn’t reliable. I’ll go inside again and report back here.

52 Cameras: # 122 — Argus Argoflex Seventy-Five




It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I've seen.  L-R reversed.

It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I’ve seen. L-R reversed.


I included this to show the film edge markings.

I included this to show the film edge markings.


Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.

Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.


Super-blurry but I like this one too.

Super-blurry but I like this one too.


I’m still trying to find my Photoshop Elements disk. It’s in a box somewhere. In the meantime, I’ve been using GIMP. The workflow is really different but it’s growing on me.
I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.

I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.




I have a few shots from disassembling the camera to clean it. I’ll combine those with photos of the 2nd tear-down to fix the shutter and post here. Hopefully followed by another roll of images.


Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. A couple of images and the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

52 Cameras: Camera 57 part 2.5 – Rolleicord III

Expired Lomo ISO 100 B&W that came with M’s Diana. I’m pretty sure it’s really Shanghai or Lucky. The emulsion and backing paper are really thin so longer exposures have the same problem I had with the Voigtlander (week 9). What looks like grain or a noisy scan is the texture (and sometimes the dots and numbers) of the backing paper showing on the negative.

A few shots came out OK. I’m really happy about that since this is the first roll I have ever processed. I used Diafine, because it’s pretty much idiot-proof, and Arista Universal Rapid fixer at ~ 70F.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Goober on the sun porch.

Goober on the sun porch.

We finally got some snow.

We finally got some snow.

Scanned on the Canon 9000f at 1200DPI. Straightened and cropped but no exposure tweaks.

52 Cameras: Camera 57 part 2 – Rolleicord III

This is a nice camera. The shutter and aperture controls are a bit stiff but they’re loosening up with use. The shutter speeds seem pretty close. It may be a couple of weeks but I’ll run another roll through it.

Kodak Ektar 100 film. Scanned on the Canoscan 9000f at 1200 DPI and resized for upload. A little cat hair cleanup in Photoshop but minimal exposure tweaks and no color correction for the bluish Ektar.

Tree tunnel.

Tree tunnel.

Grass on the bank of the Rio Grande.

Grass on the bank of the Rio Grande.

Old trucks near La Puebla, NM.

Old trucks near La Puebla, NM.

Hair flip.

Hair flip.

52 Cameras: Week 17 part 2 — Yashica 635

Techne has smiled upon me. I like to do a test run with a camera before committing to it as the camera of the week but I was so stoked to try the Yashica, I went for it.

I found interesting subject matter, used excellent Ilford XP2 Super 400 B&W film, The Camera Shop of Santa Fe did their usual stellar processing, and the camera was a delight. Even the Canoscan 9000f behaved (as well as it ever does). This was 120 film. Later, I’ll run some 35mm through the Yashica. There was a 35mm roll in the camera when I got it but sadly, no Bigfoot or Jimmy Hoffa pictures. It was blank.

Exposure values are ballpark accurate. Some I wrote down and some I didn’t. Scanned to TIFF (millions of colors) at 4800 DPI, converted back to B&W in Photoshop, and resized (~10%) and converted to JPEG for upload.

Zoe -- f3.5 at 1/25

Zoe — f3.5 at 1/25

I’ll let her tell the tale of our dinner. She’s the writer. I just take the pictures.

My sweetie at our Christmas Thai dinner -- f3.5 at 1/25

My sweetie at our Christmas Thai dinner — f3.5 at 1/25

Snoozing on the couch -- f3.5 at 1/25

Snoozing on the couch — f3.5 at 1/25

Funky trailer on Alameda - f16 at 1/500

Funky trailer on Alameda – f16 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy's Field - f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy’s Field – f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy's Field #2 - f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy’s Field #2 – f11 at 1/500

Christmas-y Frenchy's Barn -- f11 at 1/500

Christmas-y Frenchy’s Barn — f11 at 1/500

Passing through, waiting for his car to be repaired -- f11 at 1/500

Passing through, waiting for his car to be repaired — f11 at 1/500

I realized after posting that I had film upside down in the scanner and the images are mirror image.

I used Pocket Light Meter. Photos were a little overexposed so I adjusted a couple a smidge in Photoshop. I wouldn’t be surprised if a 55-year-old shutter was a wee bit slow. The only thing I did to the camera was clean the lenses.