Tag Archives: TLR

Attempted Repair of the Argoflex Seventy-Five

Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. Here’s the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

It’s pretty easy to get inside to the shutter. The first tear-down was more thorough — I removed the insert that goes from the back of the shutter to the film plane and disassembled the viewfinder. There are two screws inside the light-tight chamber.

Four screws on the front.

Four screws on the front.


This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector.  It will immediately fall out.

This copper (brass?) provides the friction to hold the Inst/Time selector. It will immediately fall out.


Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.

Two screws at the front of the viewfinder.


I completely removed the VF during the cleaning tear-down to get to the lens and mirror. The VF hood is a pain to get back in its slot so don’t do it unless you have to.
With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.

With the VF hood up, the whole front will tilt upwards.


The four front screws also hold the lens board -- it pops right out.

The four front screws also hold the lens board — it pops right out.


Without the shutter cocked, you can't really see the part the selector works.

Without the shutter cocked, you can’t really see the part the selector works.


This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.

This bit that sticks into the body is the culprit.


The triangular piece coming in at the left selects "instantaneous" or "time".

The triangular piece coming in at the left selects “instantaneous” or “time”.


Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.

Two screws hold the top of the shutter assembly.


One screw at the bottom.

One screw at the bottom.


Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.

Not sure why but the bottom screw (right) is different.


The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.

The side has the rod that cocks the shutter from the wind knob and the flash contacts.


Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn't move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).

Cocked and pressing the button, you can see the selector doesn’t move up and down but in (Inst) and out (Time).


It's a two-piece shutter.  The red opens followed by the rear that closes.  The triangle holds the rear open.

It’s a two-piece shutter. The red opens followed by the rear that closes. The triangle holds the rear open.


I thought this wasn't pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.

I thought this wasn’t pressing down enough to allow the rear shutter to close.


Bad alignment but I bent it down.  It also increased the friction.

Bad alignment but I bent it down. It also increased the friction.


Holding the triangle down with a small drill bit, the shutter worked at the instantaneous setting every time. Bending the selector seemed to work but it isn’t reliable. I’ll go inside again and report back here.

52 Cameras: # 122 — Argus Argoflex Seventy-Five




It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I've seen.  L-R reversed.

It really is one of the brighter viewfinders I’ve seen. L-R reversed.


I included this to show the film edge markings.

I included this to show the film edge markings.


Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.

Blurry from the shutter sticking but I kind of like it.


Super-blurry but I like this one too.

Super-blurry but I like this one too.


I’m still trying to find my Photoshop Elements disk. It’s in a box somewhere. In the meantime, I’ve been using GIMP. The workflow is really different but it’s growing on me.
I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.

I did a digital graduated filter on this one to boost the shadows on the bottom.




I have a few shots from disassembling the camera to clean it. I’ll combine those with photos of the 2nd tear-down to fix the shutter and post here. Hopefully followed by another roll of images.


Not much for images — the shutter still sticks. A couple of images and the disassembly/attempted repair experiment.

52 Cameras: Camera 57 part 2.5 – Rolleicord III

Expired Lomo ISO 100 B&W that came with M’s Diana. I’m pretty sure it’s really Shanghai or Lucky. The emulsion and backing paper are really thin so longer exposures have the same problem I had with the Voigtlander (week 9). What looks like grain or a noisy scan is the texture (and sometimes the dots and numbers) of the backing paper showing on the negative.

A few shots came out OK. I’m really happy about that since this is the first roll I have ever processed. I used Diafine, because it’s pretty much idiot-proof, and Arista Universal Rapid fixer at ~ 70F.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Ghost bike on NM 502.

Goober on the sun porch.

Goober on the sun porch.

We finally got some snow.

We finally got some snow.

Scanned on the Canon 9000f at 1200DPI. Straightened and cropped but no exposure tweaks.

52 Cameras: Camera 57 part 2 – Rolleicord III

This is a nice camera. The shutter and aperture controls are a bit stiff but they’re loosening up with use. The shutter speeds seem pretty close. It may be a couple of weeks but I’ll run another roll through it.

Kodak Ektar 100 film. Scanned on the Canoscan 9000f at 1200 DPI and resized for upload. A little cat hair cleanup in Photoshop but minimal exposure tweaks and no color correction for the bluish Ektar.

Tree tunnel.

Tree tunnel.

Grass on the bank of the Rio Grande.

Grass on the bank of the Rio Grande.

Old trucks near La Puebla, NM.

Old trucks near La Puebla, NM.

Hair flip.

Hair flip.

52 Cameras: Week 17 part 2 — Yashica 635

Techne has smiled upon me. I like to do a test run with a camera before committing to it as the camera of the week but I was so stoked to try the Yashica, I went for it.

I found interesting subject matter, used excellent Ilford XP2 Super 400 B&W film, The Camera Shop of Santa Fe did their usual stellar processing, and the camera was a delight. Even the Canoscan 9000f behaved (as well as it ever does). This was 120 film. Later, I’ll run some 35mm through the Yashica. There was a 35mm roll in the camera when I got it but sadly, no Bigfoot or Jimmy Hoffa pictures. It was blank.

Exposure values are ballpark accurate. Some I wrote down and some I didn’t. Scanned to TIFF (millions of colors) at 4800 DPI, converted back to B&W in Photoshop, and resized (~10%) and converted to JPEG for upload.

Zoe -- f3.5 at 1/25

Zoe — f3.5 at 1/25

I’ll let her tell the tale of our dinner. She’s the writer. I just take the pictures.

My sweetie at our Christmas Thai dinner -- f3.5 at 1/25

My sweetie at our Christmas Thai dinner — f3.5 at 1/25

Snoozing on the couch -- f3.5 at 1/25

Snoozing on the couch — f3.5 at 1/25

Funky trailer on Alameda - f16 at 1/500

Funky trailer on Alameda – f16 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy's Field - f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy’s Field – f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy's Field #2 - f11 at 1/500

Sculpture at Frenchy’s Field #2 – f11 at 1/500

Christmas-y Frenchy's Barn -- f11 at 1/500

Christmas-y Frenchy’s Barn — f11 at 1/500

Passing through, waiting for his car to be repaired -- f11 at 1/500

Passing through, waiting for his car to be repaired — f11 at 1/500

I realized after posting that I had film upside down in the scanner and the images are mirror image.

I used Pocket Light Meter. Photos were a little overexposed so I adjusted a couple a smidge in Photoshop. I wouldn’t be surprised if a 55-year-old shutter was a wee bit slow. The only thing I did to the camera was clean the lenses.

52 Cameras: Week 9 part 2 – Voigtlander Brillant (Brilliant)

There may be more photos coming. I shot a roll of Lucky Film B&W at Fairview Cemetery but Visions Photo Lab only processes black and white on Wednesdays. Visions is a great independent lab, they still do E-6 too.

My head’s not that round but I still have a goofy shadow in the foreground.

Rosario Cemetery - f16 @ 1/75

Rosario Cemetery – f16 @ 1/75

Usually the problem with this camera is getting enough light since the aperture is so small (f7.7). Using Fuji 400 on a sunny day, I had the opposite problem. The fastest shutter speed is 1/75, minimum aperture is f16, and I didn’t get any filters with the camera.

Rosario Cemetery - f16 @ 1/75

Rosario Cemetery – f16 @ 1/75

The lens’s vignetting really shows up with bright color film. I keep forgetting to use the frame counter instead of the red window. The frame size on this camera is 6cm X 6cm instead of 6X9. If I use the counter I get 12 images. If I use the frame numbers on the backing paper, I only get 8. The shutter was sticking so I only got four so it’s a moot point for this roll.

Rosario Cemetery - f16 @ 1/75

Rosario Cemetery – f16 @ 1/75

The images are really soft but I like this one with a raven.

Rosario Cemetery - f16 @ 1/75

Rosario Cemetery – f16 @ 1/75

This is a strange variant of the Brillant. The only picture I’ve been able to find that has the Voigtar 75cm/f7.7 lens and T/B/75/25 shutter speeds is on an older Bakelite body with a rotating accessory door. Mine is hinged. The older versions also had apertures of f7.7 (f9 widest on some), f11, and f22 which used a rotating punched disk. This camera has f7.7, f11, and f16 but uses a diaphragm. I have no idea who made the shutter. In addition to sticking, the timer isn’t working so I have to dissect it. Maybe there will be a label somewhere inside.

52 Cameras: Week 9 part 1.5 – Voigtlander Brillant (Brilliant)

I finally scanned the negatives from the first test with the Brilliant. That was before it was camera of the week, hence the 1.5.

I bought some cheap film from Four Corner Store. It’s Shanghai GP3 ISO 100 Pan. I don’t develop at home yet so including processing, it ended up being more expensive than grabbing a roll of something that uses a more common developer.

Hydrant with veil - f7.7 @ 1/25

Hydrant with veil – f7.7 @ 1/25

Hydrant with veil, double exposure – f7.7 @ 1/25

Hydrant with veil, double exposure – f7.7 @ 1/25

I ball-parked the time using the ‘B’ (bulb) setting.

Zoe - f7.7 @ ~ 1 sec.

Zoe – f7.7 @ ~ 1 sec.

What looks like grain is mostly the texture of the paper.

Sitting pretty - f7.7 @ ~ 1 sec

Sitting pretty – f7.7 @ ~ 1 sec

I think I have one roll of the Shanghai left and I probably won’t get any more. The numbers from the backing paper show up on longer exposures. If it was light through the film counter window, there would only be one number per frame. The only thing I can think of is that the light through the lens is reflecting off of the paper and coming back through the film, exposing the numbers. The acetate is really thin and the backing is a single layer of cheap black paper with gray numbers. Adding insult to injury, the gray numbers don’t have enough contrast against the black paper to be read through a red window. The Brilliant has a film counter but we wasted a roll trying to use it in my girlfriend’s JEM JR.